Science

RSS Feed
NPR

DNA 'Printing' A Big Boon To Research, But Some Raise Concerns

Companies are assembling and churning out tailored stretches of DNA faster and more cheaply than ever before. The tool speeds research into diseases of plants and people. But what about eugenics?
NPR

At Long Last, Taxidermied Hyenas In Chicago Get Their Own Diorama

After years tucked away in the Reptile Hall at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, four striped taxidermied hyenas are finally getting their own diorama.
NPR

California Prepares For Difficult Fire Season Amid Drought

Firefighters in California depend on water from lakes and reservoirs to help fight wildfires. But water levels have fallen because of the ongoing drought, and some water sources may be too low to use.
WAMU 88.5

Mother Of Hubble Telescope Marks 25 Years Of Exploration

Most people have seen the images sent back to Earth by the Hubble telescope. But not everyone knows the woman behind that groundbreaking instrument.

NPR

Fla. Governor Leaves Meeting With U.S. Health Secretary Empty-Handed

Despite a "good conversation" with Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell, Gov. Rick Scott gets no sign that Florida will receive the more than $1 billion he wants for health care.
NPR

Missing Link Microbes May Help Explain How Single Cells Became Us

Near a field of deep sea vents between Norway and Greenland, scientists discovered the DNA of microbes that seem to be primitive archaea, but with a lot more genes — typical of complicated creatures.
NPR

How NASA's Space Race Helped To Integrate The South

Writers Richard Paul and Steven Moss's new book is called We Could Not Fail. It's about the first African-Americans to work for NASA. They profile 10 African-American scientists and engineers.
NPR

Edison's Talking Dolls Can Now Provide The Soundtrack To Your Nightmares

Thomas Edison built and sold about 500 dolls back in 1890. Now, new technology has made hearing their supercreepy voices possible for the first time in decades. (Thanks, technology.)

NPR

Baltimore Police Shooting That Wasn't 'Illustrates Malleable Nature Of Memories'

NPR's Robert Siegel speaks to Elizabeth Loftus, professor of psychology at the University of California, Irvine, about inventing memories. False reports Monday said a man was shot by Baltimore police.
NPR

Natural GMO? Sweet Potato Genetically Modified 8,000 Years Ago

People have been farming — and eating — a GMO for thousands of years without knowing it. Scientists have found genes from bacteria in sweet potatoes around the world. So who made the GMO?

Pages