Science | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Science

RSS Feed
NPR

Finding Simple Tests For Brain Disorders Turns Out To Be Complex

There are tests for heart attacks and diabetes, but few for brain disorders. Researchers are trying to change that, but are finding the hunt for biomarkers for mental illness to be a tough slog. Tests on the market, like ones for Alzheimer's, are not conclusive.
NPR

Why You're Clapping: The Science Of Applause

What makes us clap more for some performances than others? You'd think it's obvious: The better the show, the more applause. Think again. Guest host Linda Wertheimer explores how and why applause builds.
NPR

What Is Farm Runoff Doing To The Water? Scientists Wade In

Across the Midwest this summer, scientists are wading into 100 streams to collect water samples and check cages for fish eggs. It's part of a large study to understand how pesticides and agricultural chemicals from farms are affecting the nation's streams.
NPR

Big Old Alaskan Fish Turns Out To Be Just Big, Not Old

A nearly 40-pound rockfish caught off the southwest coast of Alaska was thought to be nearly 200 years old. The answer lay in the watery beast's ear bones, which were examined in a lab in Juneau, Alaska. Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish have more.
NPR

With Rising Temperatures, Infrastructure Falters

As the western U.S. continues to bake in 100-plus degree heat, the high temperatures are making pavement buckle and power lines droop. Vicki Arroyo of the Georgetown Climate Center talks about heat's effects on infrastructure, and how cities can adapt for increasing temperatures.
NPR

Benjamin Franklin's Intellectual Revolution

Benjamin Franklin's entrepreneurial spirit fueled American innovation during his time and can still be felt today. In The Society for Useful Knowledge author Jonathan Lyons talk about how Franklin brought an intellectual revolution through practical invention, collaborative inquiry, and shared knowledge.
NPR

Farming Got Hip In Iran Some 12,000 Years Ago, Ancient Seeds Reveal

Archaeologists had considered Iran unimportant in the history of farming – until now. Ancient seeds and farming tools uncovered in Iran reveal Stone Age people there were growing lentils, barley and other crops. The findings offer a snapshot of a time when humans first started experimenting with farming.
NPR

Exploding The Mystery Of Blue Fireworks

Audie Cornish speaks with John Conkling, technical director of the American Pyrotechnics Association, about why it's so difficult to achieve the color blue in fireworks.
NPR

Scientists Grow A Simple, Human Liver In A Petri Dish

The tiny organs created from stem cells aren't complete, but they act like regular livers when transplanted into mice, Japanese scientists say. Still, it will be years before the synthetic organs could help people with liver problems, even if further research all works out as hoped.
NPR

Why You Can't Name New Moons And Planets Anything You Want

Pluto's two newest moons received their official names this week, and the name that led in the popular vote was Spock's home planet, Vulcan. But it was rejected by the international team of astronomers who must approve every title bestowed upon the universe.

Pages