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What Somebody's Mummy Can Teach You About Heart Disease

Mummies from Ancient Egypt, Peru and the U.S. all show signs of hardened arteries. But why? Researchers say bad hygiene, open hearths and maybe some deeply ingrained genetic factors were to blame.
NPR

Is Fracking To Blame For Increase In Quakes In Oklahoma?

Oklahoma is experiencing more earthquakes, and some scientists say they're caused by wastewater disposal wells. Linda Wertheimer learns more from energy reporter Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma.
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Robots & Pop Culture

We consider the role of robots - whether cyborg, android or operating system - in our culture and what they tell us about ourselves.

NPR

Problem Drinking In Midlife Linked To Memory Trouble Later

One study suggests middle-aged adults with a history of problem drinking may be twice as likely to develop serious memory issues as the years wear on.
NPR

Farming The Bluefin Tuna, Tiger Of The Ocean, Is Not Without A Price

Scientists are trying to raise prized bluefin tuna completely in captivity. An experiment at a Baltimore university is the first successful attempt in North America.
NPR

Want To Reduce Your Carbon Footprint? Choose Mackerel Over Shrimp

Sardines and other small, oily fish are some of the most nutritious in the sea. Now there's another reason to eat them: Fishermen use a lot less fuel to catch them than many other kinds of seafood.
NPR

The 30-Foot High Pile Of Bones That Could Be A DNA Treasure Trove

The Natural Trap Cave in Wyoming may hold specimens of DNA from animals who roamed thousands of years ago. Julie Meachem, a paleontologist leading the expedition into the cave, speaks with Audie Cornish about the secrets she hopes to find.
NPR

Welcome To The Nuclear Command Bunker

A small cadre of officers is responsible for keeping America's nukes on alert 24/7. Here's a peek into their world, and what it takes to do the job.
NPR

Fist Bumps Pass Along Fewer Germs Than Handshakes

That strong, sturdy handshake your grandpa taught you isn't the cleanest way to greet someone, scientists say. So should doctors and nurses in hospitals start bumping fists?
NPR

Widely Used Insecticides Are Leaching Into Midwest Rivers

Researchers found that a class of chemicals similar to nicotine and used on corn and soy farms has run off into streams and rivers in the Midwest. There they may be harming aquatic life, like insects.

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