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EPA Finds No Widespread Drinking Water Pollution From Fracking

The report says there are few incidents of tainted water given the number of wells. Energy companies agree. Environmentalists accuse the industry of undue influence over the study.
NPR

California's War Over Water Has Farmer Fighting Farmer

Drought-stricken Central Valley farmers are pointing fingers at the Sacramento Delta, where water still flows reliably. There's more pressure than ever to change a long-standing water rights system.
NPR

How Many Viruses Have Infected You?

Most tests for viruses aim to detect only one or two. But researchers can now check a drop of blood for antibodies to hundreds of viruses, tracing the history of a lifetime of infections, old and new.
WAMU 88.5

'The Barge' Seeks To Keep Invasive Species From Hitching A Ride Overseas

Researchers are working on a barge docked in Baltimore to find ways to get rid of invasive species that arrive on international cargo ships.

NPR

Newly Identified 'Hellboy' Dinosaur Sported Unique Horns, Scientists Say

The new species, a close relative of Triceratops that was discovered in Alberta, Canada, has large horns above the eyes and a crown-like frill.
NPR

Pluto's Moons Are 'Tumbling In Absolute Chaos,' NASA Says

In the NFL, something that behaves like Pluto's football-shaped moons might be called a wobbly duck. NASA calls them astonishing.
NPR

Chimps Are No Chumps: Give Them An Oven, They'll Learn To Cook

That's what researchers found when they gave chimps a device that appeared to work like an oven. The findings add to the argument that our ancestors began cooking soon after learning to control fire.
NPR

Avian Flu Outbreak Has U.S. Bakers Begging For Europe's Eggs

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said it will allow pasteurized egg imports from the Netherlands to alleviate dwindling supplies and higher prices from the ongoing outbreak on U.S. poultry farms.
NPR

Emergency Rooms Crack Down On Abusers Of Pain Pills

Hospitals in some states have begun tracking the names of patients who show up repeatedly seeking opioids. Denying these patients pills saves hospitals money, but some doctors question the ethics.
NPR

Are The Vaccine Court's Requirements Too Strict?

Before awarding compensation, the court wants a "preponderance of evidence" that a vaccine caused the injury. Some years, the nearly $4 billion fund earns more interest than it pays out in claims.

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