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NPR

Between Farmers And Frackers, Calif. Water Caught In Tussle

California's extreme drought has drawn battle lines over who gets water and who doesn't. As KQED's Lauren Sommer reports, fracking and farming are vying for freshwater in California's Central Valley.
NPR

Got Gas? It Could Mean You've Got Healthy Gut Microbes

Passing gas, in some instances, may be a sign that you're kicking your gut microbes into action. And that means they can help keep you healthy, says one scientist.
NPR

Fire-Setting Ranchers Have Burning Desire To Save Tallgrass Prairie

In eastern Kansas, ranchers burn the prairie every spring to bring back grass for grazing cattle. Environmentalists celebrate those fires because without them the delicate ecosystem would disappear.
NPR

Astronaut Twins To Separate For The Sake Of Space Travel

Before NASA can send a manned mission to Mars, it needs to know more about how extended time in space affects the human body. Mark and Scott Kelly are the perfect subjects for such an experiment.
NPR

Fossil Fans Get Their Dino-Fix Before Smithsonian Renovates

The Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., got its new T. rex just in time to close its fossil hall for five years of renovations — longer than some dinosaur fans have even been alive.
NPR

For New York, The '10-Year Storm' Isn't What It Used To Be

A new study says the worst floods in the city are both higher and 20 times more common than they were 170 years ago. But climate change is only part of the reason.
NPR

Family Tree Of Pertussis Traced, Could Lead To Better Vaccine

Scientists tracking the ancestry of whooping cough say it arose abruptly in humans about 500 years ago, caused by a mutated bacterium that once lived only in animals. Genetic tricks helped it spread.
NPR

'Don't Touch Me,' Said Canada. 'I Won't!' Said The USA. So They Moved 20 Feet Apart

Canada and the USA agreed to create a 20-foot-wide corridor between them that runs for 5,500 continuous miles. Cartographers drew the line straight, but engineers built it crooked. Take a look.
NPR

'Blood Victory' In Medical Research Dispute

The Havasupai Native American tribe celebrated Blood Victory Day this week. That's the anniversary of their legal victory over researchers who misused members' blood samples without proper consent.
WAMU 88.5

To See Stars, Arlington Students Ask You To Dim The Lights Saturday Night

Light pollution washes out all but the brightest stars in the D.C. area, something a group of Arlington sixth graders are hoping to change for just 30 minutes on Saturday night.

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