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Baby Thrives Once 3-D-Printed Windpipe Helps Him Breathe

Michigan doctors used 3-D printing to custom-make a splint to prop open Garrett Peterson's defective windpipe last January. He's home with his parents this Christmas, as "normal life" begins.
NPR

What Motivates People To Give?

The holiday season is a big time of year for charitable giving. Host Audie Cornish speaks with NPR's Shankar Vedantam about a study that says portion of charitable giving is driven by social pressure.
NPR

When Humans Quit Hunting And Gathering, Their Bones Got Wimpy

Humans have lighter bones than other primates, and that change happened a lot later than anthropologists had thought. Blame our sedentary ways after our ancestors took up farming.
NPR

Staff Picks: An Evangelical Christian Believer In Climate Change

Weekend Edition staff have been picking their favorite interviews from 2014. Editor Natalie Winston talks with NPR's Rachel Martin about an interview with an evangelical Christian climate scientist.
NPR

In The Deep Ocean, Ghostfish Breaks Records

NPR's Rachel Martin takes a moment to talk about a new fish discovered in one of the deepest places on Earth.
NPR

Want To Enhance The Flavor Of Your Food? Put On The Right Music

Researchers at the University of Oxford have discovered a link between what you taste and what you hear.
NPR

A Snail So Hardcore It's Named After A Punk Rocker

Inspired by the snails' spiky shells and acid-loving nature, researchers named the new species Alviniconcha strummeri, after Clash frontman Joe Strummer.
NPR

3-D Scanning Sonar Brings Light To Deep Ocean Shipwrecks

In San Francisco Bay, researchers are using new technology to investigate shipwrecks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with James Delgado, director of Maritime Heritage at NOAA, about what they've found.
NPR

New EPA Standards Label Toxic Coal Ash Non-Hazardous

Environmental groups had sought to have coal ash, a byproduct of coal-fired power plants, regulated as hazardous waste.
NPR

At Last, I Meet My Microbes

At 31, a woman had the bacteria in her gut catalogued as part of scientific project that aims to characterize the creatures that live inside us and affect our health. Here's what she found out.

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