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Black Voters Rethinking Gay Marriage?

On Election Day, Washington, Maine and Maryland states voted to legalize same-sex marriage, stopping a 32-state losing streak. In Maryland, African-American faith leaders took vocal positions on both sides of the issue, and host Michel Martin hears from two of them: Reverend Delman Coates and Bishop Harry Jackson, Jr.
WAMU 88.5

Former Nun Finds Her Stride As Mom, Businesswoman

Grace Steckler joined a convent at 18 — but left at 30 after realizing her chosen path wasn't right for her.

NPR

Man Behind Anti-Islamic Film Sentenced To Year In Prison

Mark Basseley Youssef admitted to violating four of eight conditions of his probation. He'd previously served 21 months in prison for bank fraud. His film, Innocence of Muslims, which depicted Prophet Muhammad as a fraud, sparked violence in the Muslim world.
NPR

Carrying The Lost With You On The Day Of The Dead

Friday is part of the Mexican national holiday, the Day of the Dead. The belief is that on this day, the dead come back to visit. So what can it tell us about the living?
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Lakota Spiritual Guidance From The Bow And Arrow

Most Americans think of the bow and arrow as a tool for hunting or sports. But writer and craftsman Joseph Marshall III has always seen the bow and arrow as a source of spiritual guidance. For Native American Heritage Month, host Michel Martin speaks with Marshall about his book The Lakota Way of Strength and Courage.
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The Truth About Nepal's Blood-Drinking Festivals

The name is pretty grisly. But these annual or semi-annual festivals, which involve yak blood and take place high in the mist-wrapped highlands of Nepal, reflect the complex relationship that Buddhists have with eating meat.
WAMU 88.5

Religion And Politics In 2012

Join Diane and her guests for a discussion about how religious beliefs are informing political convictions in the 2012 election.

NPR

Shift In Mormon Age Policy Widens Women's Options

The Mormon Church announced earlier this month that young women can begin their mission trips when they're 19 — two years earlier than the previous policy allowed. The shift is also a seismic change in philosophy — and sends the signal that young women have more options in planning their futures.

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