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NPR

More Negotiations, Still No Deal, On Shutdown, Debt Ceiling

As the U.S. gets closer to a debt default, lawmakers in both the House and Senate were in session on Monday's Columbus Day holiday to continue negotiations to find an agreement to raise the debt ceiling.
NPR

Rep. Cole: Shutting Down Government Was Not A Good Tactic

Melissa Block speaks with Republican Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma about the state of the Republican party as the government shutdown continues and the debt ceiling looms closer. Rep. Cole is deputy House whip, in charge of counting and cajoling votes from his fellow Republicans.
NPR

Optimism, But Still No Debt Deal, On Capitol Hill

President Obama postponed a meeting with congressional leadership Monday afternoon to give Senate leaders more time to work on a deal to end the shutdown and raise the debt ceiling. It's being taken as a sign that progress is being made, but the president warned that damage from a default on the nation's debts would dwarf the economic impact of the partial government shutdown.
NPR

Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar On Monday's Hill Negotiations

Melissa Block spoke with Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., about Senate negotiations on the debt ceiling and partial federal government shutdown.
NPR

An Insider's View Of The Debt Ceiling And Shutdown Talks

The government shutdown continues and so does the countdown to when the nation hits the dreaded debt ceiling. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., and Minority Leader, Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., don't seem to get along but they seem to be the last best chance to get the government running and to help the U.S. avoid default. How do two bitter adversaries negotiate? Melissa Block put that question to Jim Manley, who was a top adviser to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and, before that, press secretary to Sen. Ted Kennedy, for a former insider's look at how deals are made on Capitol Hill.
NPR

Reid And McConnell Are Optimistic As Default Deadline Looms

President Obama and Congress have until Thursday, Oct. 17, to reach a deal averting a potential credit default by the U.S. government. Both houses of Congress are meeting this afternoon.
NPR

Shutdown In Day 14, Debt Ceiling Deadline Nears

Congress and the White House continue to work through the twin fiscal crises of funding for the federal government and the debt ceiling. Steve Inskeep and David Greene explore the dimensions of this massive political drama with Cokie Roberts, who weighs in on political topics most Mondays on Morning Edition, Robert Costa of the National Review, who's been following developments on Capitol Hill, and Terence Samuel of The Washington Post, who has been following public attitudes nationally.
NPR

How The Debt Limit Became 'A Nuclear-Tipped Leverage Point'

Since Congress first passed a law that set a cap on how much debt the Treasury could accrue, it has had to raise that limit more than 100 times. And 40 of those times, lawmakers have tried to tie strings to the vote. But veterans of past fights say they have gotten more intense in recent years.
NPR

David Dinkins: Leading New York Is The 'Greatest Job There Is'

David Dinkins served as New York City's first African-American mayor. But his rise through the political ranks came with hard-learned lessons. Host Michel Martin speaks with former Mayor Dinkins about his book, A Mayor's Life: Governing New York's Gorgeous Mosaic. This segment initially aired September 2, 2013 on Tell Me More.
WAMU 88.5

Sarah Palin, Ted Cruz, Conservative Activists Storm World War II Memorial

As the impasse in Congress continued, hundreds of military veterans and Tea Party activists gathered on the mall this weekend to protest the ongoing closure of war memorials.

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