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It's All Politics, July 12, 2012

Mitt Romney, hearing boos at the NAACP convention, now knows what we go through each week on the podcast. President Obama, facing poor economic news, changes the subject with an assault on Romney and the GOP on taxes. Plus updates on Reps Charlie Rangel (victory), Jesse Jackson Jr. (health), Shelley Berkley (ethics) and Thad McCotter (skadoodle).
NPR

Cheney: If There's Another Sept. 11, I Want Romney In The Oval Office

"Sooner or later there is going to be a big surprise. Usually a very unpleasant one," the former vice president said. When that happens, he's hoping Romney will be president.
NPR

Nation's Governors Get What Federal Leaders Miss?

The bipartisan National Governors Association is meeting in Virginia, where they aim to tackle big issues, like how to grow state economies amid national uncertainty. Guest host Maria Hinojosa speaks with Nebraska Governor Dave Heineman, a Republican and outgoing chair of the National Governors Association.
NPR

Black Officials More Likely Probed For Corruption?

In Rumor, Repression and Racial Politics, author George Derek Musgrove looks at the history of black elected officials being investigated for alleged wrongdoing. He examines the role of race in U.S. politics between 1965 and 1995. Musgrove shares his research with guest host Maria Hinojosa.
NPR

Investigation Sheds Light On 'Shadow Campaign'

Washington D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray is under a criminal investigation into possible corruption during his 2010 bid for office. Three city council members recently called for his resignation. Guest host Maria Hinojosa gets the latest developments from Washington Post Reporter Nikita Stewart, who is covering the story.
NPR

How Obama Factors In States Voting On Gay Marriage

Strategists say the president's support for same-sex marriage is helping both sides in states where the issue will appear on November ballots.
NPR

How Battleground States See The Economy

The economic recovery is still tepid in most parts of the country, and there's a sense of trepidation that signs of improvement might not last. Among the swing states, some are doing comparatively well while others are struggling — but the political picture looks roughly the same in all.

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