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Is An Electromagnetic Pulse Attack A Threat?

At Tuesday night's GOP presidential candidate debate, the last question was: What national security issue do you worry about that nobody is asking about? Answers ranged from socialist rebels to communist China to cyber attacks to joblessness. But Newt Gingrich mentioned a threat that certainly has not been talked about this campaign season: an electromagnetic pulse attack. Guy Raz talks with Noah Shachtman, who writes on national security for Wired magazine, about this potential national security threat.
WAMU 88.5

Cardin Still Waiting On Transparency Rules

Congress passed a law meant to create more openness in Wall Street more than a year ago, but as Sen. Ben Cardin notes, the SEC is dragging its feet.

NPR

Iran Launches Some GOP Debate Rhetoric To Flights Of Fancy

If the U.S. continues to be the Great Satan in eyes of many Iranian officials, capable of inspiring over-the-top rhetoric in Teheran, Iran appears to have a similar affect on U.S. politicians, propelling them to flights of excess.
NPR

Pro-Huntsman Ad Asks N.H. Voters: 'Why Haven't We Heard Of This Guy?'

A new campaign ad asserts that New Hampshire voters just need a chance to get to know Jon Huntsman. But the candidate's issues run deeper than lack of name recognition.
WAMU 88.5

Officials Go After Occupy Richmond Protesters

After being forceably evicted from their camp in a local park, Occupy Richmond protesters are now facing a challenge for their encampment on the property of a local resident.

NPR

Countdown To Iowa And New Hampshire Primaries

The top Republican presidential candidates wrapped up another debate Tuesday night and now turn to the nation's first two primary states: Iowa and New Hampshire. With the Iowa caucus just six weeks away, guests explain how each candidate is courting voters, and how the campaign is playing out.
NPR

How To Talk Politics At The Dinner Table

Conventional wisdom advises against talking about politics at family gatherings, but that's often unrealistic. With the turbulent race for president and the roiling Occupy protests — not to mention the usual politics of food, football and in-laws — some discussion guidelines can be helpful.

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