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Boehner: GOP Won't Support Raising Tax Rates

House Speaker John Boehner went before the press on Friday as the White House and Congress quickly shifted from the election to the so-called "fiscal cliff."
NPR

Obama Insists On Tax Hikes For Wealthy Americans

On Friday, President Obama made his first public remarks since winning re-election. He used the moment to insist on greater revenues from the affluent in any deal to avoid the fiscal cliff.
WAMU 88.5

International Adoptions

Russia's move to ban American adoptions of Russian children forces international diplomacy into the lives of some families. Kojo explores the challenges of inter-country adoption.

WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour

Former D.C. Council Member William Lightfoot (I-At Large) and U.S. Rep. Donna Edwards (D-Md.) join the Politics Hour crew.

NPR

Obama's Feat: Not Just Winning, But How He Won

Many of the minority groups central to President Obama's victory had long supported Democrats. But he's the first party leader to put together a stable — and majority — coalition since Franklin D. Roosevelt back in the 1930s. This coalition promises to pay dividends to his party for years to come.
WAMU 88.5

Analysis: Looking Ahead After Decisive Election Days in Virginia, Maryland, D.C.

Election Day results are broken down by Washington Post columnist Bob McCartney, who observes the purple state trend in Virginia, Gov. O'Malley's rising star in Maryland, and a renewed commitment to ethics on the D.C. Council.

NPR

Obama Says He's 'Open To Compromise,' But Solutions Must Be 'Balanced'

In his first address to the nation since his victory celebration Election Night in Chicago, the president repeated some themes from the campaign: that he wants spending cuts to be balanced with revenue increases. And the wealthiest Americans, he said, must be asked to "pay a little more in taxes."
NPR

It's All Politics, Nov. 8, 2012

Election Day has come and gone, but NPR's Ron Elving and Ken Rudin are still trying to make sense of it all. Was it close? Well, a 50-to-48 percent popular-vote edge for President Obama certainly indicates that. But the Electoral College split was another story.

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