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Romney Didn't Want To Run, Son Says

The 2012 Republican presidential nominee had to be convinced by his family to get into the race, his son tells the Boston Globe. "He wanted to be president less than anyone I've met in my life," Tagg Romney says.
NPR

Remembering Those Who Left Us In 2012

George McGovern, Arlen Specter, Warren Rudman, Dan Inouye ... just some of the political giants who died in 2012. This week's super-sized Political Junkie column is dedicated to their memory.
NPR

DUI Charge: Jan. 4 Court Date For Idaho Sen. Crapo

A conservative U.S. senator from Idaho who has said he doesn't drink because of his Mormon faith has been charged with drunken driving. Sen. Michael Crapo, a three-term Republican, registered a blood alcohol content of .11 percent after police pulled his car over in this suburb south of Washington, D.C., authorities said.
NPR

Fiscal Cliff, Gun Debate Looms As Lawmakers Take Holiday Break

Many lawmakers in Washington have headed home for the holidays. They're taking a break from heated debate over gun violence and the fiscal cliff — the automatic tax hikes and spending cuts set to take effect with the new year. Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin talks with NPR's White House correspondent Scott Horsley about where things stand and what's ahead for the looming fiscal cliff and the gun debate.
NPR

How Boehner's 'Critical Moment' Could Turn Out OK For Him

The House speaker is trying to emerge from a blow from his own party. But if John Boehner can pull off a bipartisan agreement to avert the fiscal cliff, he could come out of this better off.
NPR

Slipping Off The 'Fiscal Cliff' Might Give Obama A Leg Up

There's still no agreement between President Obama and House Speaker John Boehner on how to avoid looming tax hikes and spending cuts. But Noam Scheiber of The New Republic argues no agreement is good news for Obama. Host Guy Raz talks with Scheiber about why he believes Obama must go over the fiscal cliff to save his second term. Raz also talks with NPR's senior Washington editor Ron Elving about the latest political maneuvering.

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