Politics | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Politics

RSS Feed
NPR

Congress Stuck With Supercommittee's Leftovers

In addition to coming up with a deficit reduction plan, the Congressional supercommittee was also charged with handling so many unrelated tasks that its failure last week has left Congress with a sizeable workload in its remaining weeks this year. NPR congressional correspondent David Welna joins host Audie Cornish to set the stage for December.
NPR

New Hampshire Takes Another Look At Ron Paul

The Texas congressman drew less than 8 percent of the vote in the state in 2008. But things could be significantly different this time as Paul reaches into new corners of the electorate: He's adding independents and registered Republicans to his base of young voters and hard-core libertarians.

NPR

A Second Look At Last Year's Deficit Reduction Plan

The failure of the congressional supercommittee to reach a deal on reducing federal government deficits is being called another example of dysfunction and gridlock in Washington. New attention is now focused back on the plan put forth last year by President Obama's bipartisan deficit reduction commission, a blueprint that a number of Democrats and Republicans endorsed. Host Scott Simon talks with former Sen. Alan Simpson, former co-chair of that deficit reduction commission, about the failed negotiations of the supercommittee.
NPR

In Iowa, Obama Backers Seek To Rekindle Enthusiasm

Iowa voters catapulted the young senator from Illinois to victory in the state's leadoff caucuses four years ago. The president's campaign, which is gearing up in the early states ahead of next year's election, is counting on activists to stick with him in 2012.
NPR

Even Lawmakers Ask: Does Anyone Like Congress?

Last month, for the first time ever, a CBS-New York Times poll showed Congress' approval rating had plunged to a single digit — 9 percent. And following this week's failure by the supercommittee to agree on a deficit reduction plan, many lawmakers fear that number can only get worse.

Pages