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NPR

Fight Over Extending Payroll Tax Cut Flares Up Again

House Republicans are rejecting a bipartisan compromise approved overwhelmingly by the Senate Saturday. The deal would have extended the payroll tax holiday and unemployment benefits through February.
WAMU 88.5

Van Hollen Opposes Saving Defense Department From Budget Cuts

Republicans are stepping up efforts to protect the Pentagon from budget cuts, but Rep. Chris Van Hollen says that won't help the economic situation at all.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Republicans Wait To Weigh In On GOP Candidates

Virginia Republicans have to wait two months before they can weigh in on the GOP race for the White House.
NPR

Run Against Gingrich? Cooter From 'Dukes' Did

You might remember Ben Jones as Cooter the mechanic on The Dukes of Hazzard, but Jones also spent two terms in Congress. In 1994, he faced off against a very interesting opponent: current Republican presidential frontrunner Newt Gingrich.
WAMU 88.5

Occupy DC Inspires Protesters Across U.S.

The persistence that has been present among Occupy DC protesters has motivated other protesters across the U.S.
NPR

Vaclav Havel, Leader Of The Velvet Revolution, Dies

Vaclav Havel, the Czech playwright who led a revolution to bring down the country's communist regime, has died. During the communist era, Havel was one of Eastern Europe's foremost dissident writers and champion of human rights. He was 75.
NPR

Romney Seeks Gingrich's Tea Party Lead In S.C.

South Carolina's Tea Party-backed Gov. Nikki Haley has not only endorsed Mitt Romney, she regaled him with glowing tributes at every campaign stop in the multi-city tour over the weekend. Romney is fighting to show South Carolinians he is more conservative than New Gingrich.
NPR

Senate OKs Two More Months For Payroll Tax Cut

Each year, as Congress works to wrap up budget and tax bills and other "must-pass" legislation, inevitably not so must-pass items creep into the mix — inserted either to smooth passage for the more important things, or in the hopes that no one will notice. This year marks the first time that leadership has been unable to use earmarks to buy off reluctant votes, and has turned to other forms of grease instead. NPR's David Welna reports.

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