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Sequester Cuts Free Some Immigration Detainees

Reaction is coming in after the Obama administration's unusual move releasing immigration detainees due to budget cuts. An Arizona sheriff is blasting the sequestration gridlock for undermining the safety of local communities. Immigrant rights groups, however, say it shouldn't take a budget crisis to do what they think is right.
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At 85, 'Old-School' Politician Shows No Signs Of Quitting

Elected in 1956, Wisconsin state Sen. Fred Risser is the longest-serving state lawmaker in the country. He may not use Facebook, Twitter or email, but he's gotten a lot done over the years. Considered an "institution within an institution" by some, he was just re-elected for another four years.
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Supreme Court Weighs Future Of Voting Rights Act

The provision at issue in Wednesday's case before the court applies to parts of the U.S. where discriminatory voting practices were once rampant. The formula that covers those areas hasn't changed since 1975. The crux of the case: whether times have changed so much that Congress violated the Constitution when it reauthorized the law in 2006.
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Advocates Warn Sequester Could Mean Big Cuts For The Low-Income

Those who serve low- and middle-income people warn that cuts required by the looming sequester will hurt programs that many Americans rely on, like meals for seniors, heating assistance and nutritional aid for expectant mothers. But supporters of the sequester say those fears are overblown.
NPR

Has The U.S. Outgrown The Voting Rights Act?

The Supreme Court is reviewing a key section of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, originally designed to wring institutionalized discrimination from voting in the Old South. It follows an election season when the act was used to forestall proposed changes in several states.
NPR

Most Republicans Who Signed Support For Same-Sex Marriage Aren't In Office

A large group of prominent Republicans signed on to an amicus brief that argues in favor of a constitutional right to marry for gay Americans. Only two of the politicians, however, are likely to face voters again. While the public at large has moved rapidly on the issue and now favors gay marriage, Republican voters do not.

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