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Whose Money? SuperPACs To Reveal Records

Residents of Illinois and Louisiana this week have been bombarded by TV ads attacking one or another presidential candidate, the vast majority of them funded by superPACs, groups that run TV ads like a regular candidate's campaign, but legally have nothing to do with the candidate they support. Tuesday night, they must file a report detailing who gave them money and how they spent it. Host Rachel Martin talks with NPR's S.V. Dáte.
NPR

Puerto Rico Holds Primary With Statehood In Mind

Puerto Ricans are American citizens who do not vote in U.S. presidential general elections, but they do participate in Republican and Democratic nominating contests. Sunday, Puerto Rico holds a GOP primary. Both Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney visited the island this week. From San Juan, NPR's David Welna reports.
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Prince George's County To Hold Town Hall On Jobs Bill

Prince George's County Council members are holding a town hall meeting Monday evening to discuss the benefits of the recently passed Jobs First Act.
NPR

Starring On Capitol Hill: The Celebrity Or The Cause?

Despite the excitement surrounding actor and activist George Clooney's visit to Washington, D.C., this week, there's nothing new about stars testifying before Congress.

NPR

Who Will Rule In Congress?: A Look At The Races

One third of the Senate and the entire House of Representatives are up for election in November. Host Jacki Lyden talks with NPR's Ken Rudin about some of the congressional races to watch in 2012.
NPR

When Polls Conflict: What Political Gauges Mean

Guest Host Jacki Lyden speaks with Andy Kohut, president of the Pew Center, about the real significance of approval ratings and polls in this 2012 election season.
NPR

Congress' Split On Afghanistan Isn't Along Party Lines

Should the U.S. leave now, go later or reinforce? Just as the nation is divided over the war in Afghanistan, so too is Congress. As usual, Democrats and Republicans are arguing, but this time it's among themselves.

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