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Politics

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NPR

Twitter: From Infancy To Political Powerhouse

Five years ago, Twitter was hardly a blip on the political radar. Now, it's a social media giant. President Obama recently urged college student to take to Twitter and pressure their representatives on student loan interest rates. Host Michel Martin discusses the role of Twitter in politics with NPR's Don Gonyea and SocialFlow's Frank Speiser.
NPR

Political Chat: What A Difference 5 Years Makes

Host Michel Martin marks Tell Me More's 5th anniversary on NPR's airwaves by speaking with political strategists Donna Brazile and Ron Christie. They discuss the past five and next five years in politics. They examine the dividing lines of race, gender, and party, and what they mean for our political future.
WAMU 88.5

New Disclosure Rules for Political Ads

The FCC on Friday handed down new rules requiring the nation's top television stations to put information about political ads online. We explore how this will affect campaigns nationally, and in swing states like Virginia.

WAMU 88.5

Cyber Bill Passes House, But Faces Veto Threat

A new cyber security bill was ushered in through the U.S. House, but the legislation faces a veto threat from the White House.

NPR

Caro's 'Passage Of Power': LBJ's Political Genius

Robert Caro's fourth book on the life of Lyndon B. Johnson documents the master statesman's most tumultuous years — from his dismal vice presidency to his ascent to the presidency and triumphant shepherding of the 1964 Civil Rights Act through Congress.
NPR

Romney's Big-Dollar 'Bundlers' Stay Anonymous

Since 2000, every presidential nominee has revealed the names of influential supporters known as "bundlers" who persuade others to give money to a candidate. But this year, Mitt Romney's campaign is not identifying its bundlers.
NPR

Extremism In Congress: 'Even Worse Than It Looks'?

The two Washington political veterans who wrote the new book claim today's Congress is probably the most dysfunctional since the Civil War — and they aren't afraid to point fingers at who they think is to blame: the Republican Party.

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