Opinion | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Opinion

RSS Feed
NPR

After Years Of Pasta, Rice Returns To A Filipino Family Kitchen

Growing up, Melanie Vanderlipe Ramil wanted to be as "non-Filipino" as possible. One way, she decided, was to stop eating rice. Now 31, Ramil has become the family's champion of its Filipino food traditions.
NPR

Debate: Does Spying Keep Us Safe?

Some argue that spying on vast numbers of innocent people is a violation of privacy, as well as a waste of security resources. But others argue that mass electronic surveillance is vital to the fight against terrorism. A team of experts debates for the latest Intelligence Squared U.S.
NPR

Witnessing History In A Dallas Emergency Room

When he went to work on Nov. 22, 1963, ambulance driver Aubrey Rike had no idea that he would soon be offering a moment of support to Jacqueline Kennedy. "It was unbelievable that something like that happened, and he was part of it," says Rike's widow, Glenda.
NPR

Debate: Has The Right To Bear Arms Outlived Its Usefulness?

Some argue that if Americans were writing the Constitution over again in 2013, it wouldn't make sense to include the right to bear arms. A group of experts faces off over whether Americans' Second Amendment rights are outdated in the latest Intelligence Squared U.S. debate.
NPR

In Basketball, It's Always About What's Next

Things move so fast in college basketball that there are three players this year who are being called "the next LeBron James. " In the NBA, most of the talk is already about where the superstars will be next season.
NPR

2016 Polling Comes Too Soon For This Political Reporter

A recent email sent to Don Gonyea announced that Chris Christie trails Hillary Clinton in a hypothetical 2016 race for the presidency. As a political reporter for NPR, Gonyea loves the campaign trail. But this early in the game, he wonders if there aren't more important things to talk about.
NPR

Making New Connections On A Trapped Subway Train

Laura Lane was heading to work when her train got stuck. Conductor Paquita Williams was soon walking through the cars, putting passengers at ease in the darkness. Laura was so impressed with how Paquita handled the two-hour ordeal, she wanted to learn more about her.
NPR

Why Has Football Become So Brutish?

The owner of the Miami Dolphins says he will meet Wednesday with the player who has accused teammates of harassment. Frank Deford says the allegations represent just the most recent disgrace for football.
NPR

Did Rand Paul Commit Plagiarism, Or Just A Faux Pas?

The flap over the Kentucky senator's articles and speeches is just the latest in a series of cases of plagiarism by high-profile journalists and politicians. Linguist Geoff Nunberg looks at the way the word plagiarism has been used since it was invented by the Romans and wonders if it's always immoral or just bad form.
NPR

Severely Burned Marine Finds Strength In Nascent Marriage

Anthony Villarreal and his wife, Jessica, had to rebuild their lives after an explosion almost killed Anthony in Afghanistan. "I didn't even recognize myself," Anthony says, though his new wife was determined to be there for him throughout the painful process.

Pages