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What To Expect When You're Expecting ... To Share Your Baby Photos

Smartphones and the Internet have made it easier than ever for people to share photos of their friends, family, pets and children. But sharing personal photos raises technological and ethical questions. Fresh Air tech contributor Alexis Madrigal recently became a father and has some tips for navigating the world of online photo sharing.
NPR

Letters: Not 'Just A Trucker' And John Mayer's Soulful Strumming

Robert Siegel and Melissa Block read emails from listeners about John Mayer's performance chat with guest host Ari Shapiro, and a listener's rebuke of a story about a 60-year-old Japanese man who was switched with another baby at birth.
NPR

Neither Impeachment Nor An ER Page Could Keep Them Apart

NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg and surgeon David Reines ran into each other not long after their spouses had passed away. Soon — despite a couple of unforeseen events — the pair realized it was kismet that they had found each other.
NPR

An Abuse Survivor Finds Family In A Special Teacher

Rogelio Martinez was being abused when he started taking Lisa Moya King's dance class. Soon, Rogelio ran away, and Lisa took him in when he had nowhere to go. "You showed me that I'm not alone," Rogelio says. "That I actually have somebody."
NPR

The Horse Who Picked Up A Paintbrush

After his career at the racetrack ended, Metro Meteor was adopted by an artist in Pennsylvania, who discovered the horse's gift. Now, his paintings raise money to treat his knee problems and to help other retired thoroughbreds find new homes.
NPR

After Years Of Pasta, Rice Returns To A Filipino Family Kitchen

Growing up, Melanie Vanderlipe Ramil wanted to be as "non-Filipino" as possible. One way, she decided, was to stop eating rice. Now 31, Ramil has become the family's champion of its Filipino food traditions.
NPR

Debate: Does Spying Keep Us Safe?

Some argue that spying on vast numbers of innocent people is a violation of privacy, as well as a waste of security resources. But others argue that mass electronic surveillance is vital to the fight against terrorism. A team of experts debates for the latest Intelligence Squared U.S.
NPR

Witnessing History In A Dallas Emergency Room

When he went to work on Nov. 22, 1963, ambulance driver Aubrey Rike had no idea that he would soon be offering a moment of support to Jacqueline Kennedy. "It was unbelievable that something like that happened, and he was part of it," says Rike's widow, Glenda.
NPR

Debate: Has The Right To Bear Arms Outlived Its Usefulness?

Some argue that if Americans were writing the Constitution over again in 2013, it wouldn't make sense to include the right to bear arms. A group of experts faces off over whether Americans' Second Amendment rights are outdated in the latest Intelligence Squared U.S. debate.
NPR

In Basketball, It's Always About What's Next

Things move so fast in college basketball that there are three players this year who are being called "the next LeBron James. " In the NBA, most of the talk is already about where the superstars will be next season.

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