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Just Deserts Follow Attempted Pasty Tax

This week, the British government reversed course on a plan to place a 20 percent tax on hot foods like pasties, a humble food more associated with the layman than a posh parliamentarian. Sometimes those politicians must eat their words.
NPR

Letters: The Politics Of Naming Beverages

Robert Siegel and Melissa Block read emails from listeners about all sorts of beverages.
NPR

Week In Politics: Jobs Report, Wis. Recall

Robert Siegel speaks with our regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks of The New York Times. They discuss the new jobs report.
NPR

When Mom Is Right, And Tells Police They're Wrong

Robert Holmes' family was one of the first African-American families to move into Edison, N.J., in 1956. At 13, he planned to go for a swim in the local pool. He was told he couldn't enter, so his mom told him to crawl under the turnstile.
NPR

A Family's Visit To Holocaust 'Stumbling Stones' Evokes Strong Emotions

When NPR's Jeffrey Katz took his family to see the stones memorializing his relatives who were victims of the Holocaust, he was struck by the "selfless dedication of a new generation of Germans who feel a responsibility to keep their memories alive."
NPR

Tina Brown's Must Reads: The Queen's Jubilee

As Britain celebrates Queen Elizabeth II's Diamond Jubilee, marking 60 years for her as monarch, Newsweek editor Tina Brown recommends readings on the history of the Queen's reign and her enduring popularity.
NPR

The Word 'Hopefully' Is Here To Stay, Hopefully

When The Associated Press said it would no longer condemn the use of the adverb "hopefully" in its style guide, most people shrugged. But the announcement was a red flag to people who have made the adverb the biggest bugaboo of English usage over the past 50 years.

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