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NPR

The Venus Transit: Who Cares?

There is far deeper and far more intimate reason why the Venus transit matters and it's all about Time.
NPR

Lessons Learned From The John Edwards Trial

A federal judge declared a mistrial in the campaign finance case against former Sen. John Edwards. Since the trial, numerous writers and columnists have considered what we've learned about the former presidential candidate, political campaigns and ourselves through the weeks of uncomfortable testimony.
NPR

Just Deserts Follow Attempted Pasty Tax

This week, the British government reversed course on a plan to place a 20 percent tax on hot foods like pasties, a humble food more associated with the layman than a posh parliamentarian. Sometimes those politicians must eat their words.
NPR

Letters: The Politics Of Naming Beverages

Robert Siegel and Melissa Block read emails from listeners about all sorts of beverages.
NPR

Week In Politics: Jobs Report, Wis. Recall

Robert Siegel speaks with our regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks of The New York Times. They discuss the new jobs report.
NPR

When Mom Is Right, And Tells Police They're Wrong

Robert Holmes' family was one of the first African-American families to move into Edison, N.J., in 1956. At 13, he planned to go for a swim in the local pool. He was told he couldn't enter, so his mom told him to crawl under the turnstile.
NPR

A Family's Visit To Holocaust 'Stumbling Stones' Evokes Strong Emotions

When NPR's Jeffrey Katz took his family to see the stones memorializing his relatives who were victims of the Holocaust, he was struck by the "selfless dedication of a new generation of Germans who feel a responsibility to keep their memories alive."

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