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Terror Threat Shakes Up NSA Debate, Unites Some Lawmakers

After weeks of talk about whether National Security Agency surveillance programs should be curbed, voices are now praising the programs' effectiveness. Meanwhile, many embassies across North Africa and the Middle East remain closed.
NPR

Snowden Case Illustrates Decline In U.S.-Russia Relations

Russia has become a relations nightmare for the United States, and its offer of temporary asylum to the NSA leaker and fugitive is only the tip of the iceberg.
NPR

State Department Extends Closure Of Embassies

More than 20 diplomatic posts, including consulates, have been temporarily shut down throughout the Middle East and the Arabian peninsula and the State Department has issued a global travel warning for Americans.
NPR

Senate Democrats Proposa FISA Court Reform

New legislation would reform the FISA court, the secret court that rules on whether the government can pursue certain surveillance activities — including the NSA spying programs that have caused recent controversy. Host Rachel Martin speaks with Senator Tom Udall of New Mexico, who co-sponsored the bill.
NPR

U.S. Embassies In The Muslim World Closed Sunday

The Department of State has issued a travel alert over the continued potential for terrorist attacks, particularly in the Middle East and North Africa. NPR's Dina Temple-Raston speaks with Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin about the threat of more attacks.
NPR

Week In News: Terror Alert

The U.S. State Department issued a warning to Americans traveling abroad this weekend, as well as to many embassies and consulates, that it has learned of the possibility of a terrorist attack. Host Jacki Lyden speaks with James Fallows of The Atlantic.
NPR

Pentagon Papers Leaker Daniel Ellsberg Praises Snowden, Manning

The man who in 1971 went public with the comprehensive study of two decades of U.S. policy in Vietnam spoke with NPR's Weekend Edition Saturday.
NPR

How A Leaker Decides To Spill The Beans

Daniel Ellsberg, the famous whistle-blower who leaked the Pentagon Papers when he was a military analyst in 1971, was tried under the Espionage Act. Guest host Linda Wertheimer talks to Ellsberg about how he views leakers Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden in light of his own story.
NPR

U.S. State Department Cautiously On Alert

U.S. embassies and consulates throughout the Muslim world will be closed on Sunday and possible for longer. The State Department says it is taking the step "out of an abundance of caution" and wouldn't say if they are receiving direct threats. Members of Congress say there are concerns about an al-Qaida-linked attack. Last year, the U.S. ambassador to Libya was killed in Benghazi, along with three other Americans. At that time, there were also violent protests at U.S. embassies in Cairo and Tunisia.
NPR

What A New Surveillance Court Could Look Like

Foreign Intelligence Surveillance courts received increased attention following the leaks about programs monitoring U.S. citizens. Some lawmakers are proposing changes to secret courts, including Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). He speaks with Melissa Block about the proposal.

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