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NPR

Cold War Technology Sought By Spy Is In Your Pocket — Sort Of

Federal authorities have arrested a Chinese national who is accused of trying to buy accelerometers from a company in suburban Seattle. Certain kinds of accelerometers are subject to export controls, because they're used to guide missiles and spacecraft. The U.S. has been trying to keep accelerometer technology under wraps for half a century. Even as some accelerometers were used to guide Cold War missiles into space and around the world, today's technological descendents allow you to play racing games on your iPhone.
NPR

The Art And Practice Of Protecting American Technology

The recent allegations that a Chinese spy was trying to steal technology are in fact nothing new. Audie Cornish talks to James Lewis, a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, about protecting U.S. technology from spying abroad.
NPR

Snowden's Leaks About NSA Lead To Awards For 4 Reporters

Journalists who broke the news in The Guardian and The Washington Post are among those receiving this year's George Polk Awards in Journalism. Without their work, the stories "would not have seen the light of day."
NPR

Marine Commandant Launches Offensive Against Bad Behavior

After 12 plus years of war in Afghanistan and Iraq, the commandant of the Marine Corps is taking stock of where the Marine Corps is headed as an institution. Gen. James Amos is examining issues from discipline and sexual assault, to how to keep Marines who signed up to fight engaged. During a recent visit to Los Angeles, Gen. Amos sat down with Renee Montagne to talk about his efforts.
NPR

How Most Anyone Can Find Photos Of Secret Government Sites

Just by searching online, researchers found the buildings where the North Korean military is believed to be building launchers for ballistic missiles. Google Earth and cheap satellite images make this kind of intelligence gathering possible for most anyone with an Internet connection.
NPR

Friend Finds Humanity In The Death Of Journalist Daniel Pearl

Journalist Asra Nomani spent years trying to process the death of her good friend, Daniel Pearl, who was killed by terrorists in Pakistan. Host Michel Martin hears why Nomani needed to tell Pearl's final story. This segment originally aired Jan. 28, 2014, on Tell Me More.
NPR

With A Citizen In The Crosshairs, Where's The Line Drawn For Drones?

The Obama administration is considering targeting an American citizen who is suspected of plotting a terrorist attack. The possibility again raises questions about U.S. drone policy and whether an American's citizenship rights are lost once that person joins a terrorist organization.
NPR

In Security Cases, Feds No Longer Get Benefit Of The Doubt

Disclosures by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden have shaken the intelligence community and spurred Congress to try to impose new limits on electronic surveillance. In recent weeks, aftershocks from those leaks have been rippling through the courts too. Some judges have signaled they're no longer willing to take the government's word when it comes to national security.
NPR

Global Military Spending Set To Rise In 2014

For the first time in five years, worldwide military spending is expected to go up, with China and Russia leading the way. The U.S. military budget is facing pressure, but the $600 billion in annual spending is roughly the same as the next 14 countries combined.
NPR

The Internet Flexes Political Muscle With Anti-NSA Protest

It won't be as powerful as the strike against SOPA and PIPA in 2012, when Wikipedia blocked its site, Google blacked out its logo and millions of people joined in. But "The Day We Fight Back" on Tuesday is intended to show lawmakers that there's ongoing public pressure to reform mass surveillance laws.

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