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Dispute And Suspicion Swirl About Iranian Water Reactor

At issue in Iran nuclear talks is a heavy water reactor the country is building. Iran says it wants the reactor for medical research, but the West is worried that such reactors can produce plutonium.
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General Takes Plea Deal In Sexual Assault Case

An Army general accused of sexually assaulting a subordinate has pleaded guilty to lesser charges. The case against him collapsed under doubts about the accuser's credibility.
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Uniform Rule May Keep Religious Americans From Military Service

Observant Sikhs need to get an exemption in order to keep maintain long hair and beards. One service member who is Sikh says the application process has a chilling effect on those who want to serve.
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Photo Identification: The 'Best And Worst Way' To ID People

How reliably can we find the fakes? A new study says the more forgeries people come across, the better they are at spotting them. But there are multiple traps that can cloud screeners' judgment.
NPR

Senate-CIA Clash Goes Behind Closed Doors

The dust is still settling on Capitol Hill after California Democrat Dianne Feinstein fired a verbal bazooka at the Central Intelligence Agency on Tuesday, and the fight is far from over.
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U.S. Monitors For Cyber Operations In Crimea Standoff

The standoff between Russia and Ukraine is being watched closely to see how a tool of modern warfare, cyber operations, might be employed. So far, what's been seen isn't too sophisticated.
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Where Does The U.S. Stand On Secessionist Movements Abroad?

In an upcoming referendum, Crimean voters will decide whether to declare independence from Ukraine. Jonathan Paquin has studied U.S. stances on breakaway groups, and he explains what to watch for.
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Debate: Should The President Be Able To Order Citizens Killed Abroad?

In the latest Intelligence Squared debate, two teams face off over the constitutionality of targeting terrorist suspects abroad — particularly when those individuals are U.S. citizens.
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Small-Scale Attacks Could Bring Down U.S. Power Grid, Report Says

Last year, snipers nearly knocked out an electric substation in California. If just nine such facilities were put out of commission, the entire grid could go down for months, federal regulators warn.
NPR

Would-Be Shoebomber Testifies Against Bin Laden's Son-In-Law

The Osama bin Laden's son-in-law is on trial in New York City, accused of complicity in a shoe-bombing plot. Benjamin Weiser, who is covering the trial for The New York Times, explains the latest.

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