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NPR

Chinese Activist's Escape Quickens A Quiet Diplomacy

Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng is believed to be under U.S. protection in Beijing. His escape puts both China and the U.S. in a tricky diplomatic bind, with no easy answers.
NPR

Civil Liberties Groups See Holes In Cyber Defense Bill

The House has approved a bill designed to improve the nation's defenses against cyber attacks by foreign governments or terrorists. The measure would make it easier for the government and private sector to share data about suspected cyber threats. Civil liberties groups say the bill is a threat to privacy and Internet freedom. Even though it passed the House with significant support from Democrats, the White House is threatening a veto. NPR's Steve Henn reports.
NPR

Profiled By The TSA? There's An App For That

Sikhs and other religious and minority groups often say they're unfairly singled out for additional screening. Now they hope to make their case with the help of a new mobile app.
NPR

Wounded Warriors Face New Enemy: Overmedication

The Pentagon set up special battalions to help returning troops recover from their battlefield wounds. But some of those soldiers have been given excessive amounts of prescription drugs, which are causing additional problems.
NPR

Cyberwar May Be New Tool In Iran's Arsenal

U.S. lawmakers have eagerly speculated about the threat that would be represented by a nuclear-armed Iran. Now they have a new concern: a cyber-armed Iran. Security experts are looking closely at Iran's cyber capabilities and considering whether Iran might be tempted to launch a cyber attack on the United States, possibly in retaliation for a U.S. or Israeli strike on its nuclear facilities.
NPR

U.S. Considers Ways To Keep Drones In Pakistan

Pakistan's Parliament has recommended that the U.S. be prohibited from launching drone missile attacks on Pakistani soil. The drone program has been successful in killing militants in Pakistan, many of whom were launching attacks against American troops in neighboring Afghanistan. Analysts say it's unlikely the U.S. will agree to stop carrying out missile strikes from the unmanned aerial vehicles. The question is what happens now?

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