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How Would A President Romney Handle Afghanistan?

A U.S. Army staff sergeant's alleged massacre of Afghan civilians has raised calls for the U.S. to leave Afghanistan before the end-of-2014 timetable set by President Obama. Even some Republican presidential candidates are saying it is time to end the war. But not Mitt Romney.
NPR

Cybersecurity Bill: Vital Need Or Just More Rules?

The prospect of a paralyzing cyberattack has convinced U.S. security officials and lawmakers that a new law may be needed to promote improved cyberdefenses at critical facilities. Progress on that legislation, however, has been slowed by a debate over whether new cybersecurity measures should be mandated or merely encouraged.
NPR

Accused Sergeant Heads Down A Long Legal Road

Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales faces a military justice system that works differently from civilian criminal law in the U.S. or in Afghanistan. It's a case that's expected to be lengthy and complicated.
NPR

FBI Still Struggling With Supreme Court's GPS Ruling

The Supreme Court recently said police overstepped their legal authority by planting a GPS tracker on the car of a suspected drug dealer without a search warrant. The decision set off alarm bells at the FBI, where officials are trying to determine whether they need to change the way they work.
NPR

Congress' Split On Afghanistan Isn't Along Party Lines

Should the U.S. leave now, go later or reinforce? Just as the nation is divided over the war in Afghanistan, so too is Congress. As usual, Democrats and Republicans are arguing, but this time it's among themselves.
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Defense Contractors See Hope In Homeland Security

With defense spending taking a hit, contractors are looking for new markets. The Department of Homeland Security is one of the most promising — especially border security. At a recent expo, businesses showed off their goods that might help strengthen America's borders.
NPR

Panetta Met With Security Breach In Afghanistan

Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta is in Afghanistan on Wednesday. As he arrived, a vehicle exploded at the base where the secretary was scheduled to speak. Panetta is unhurt, and it's not clear whether it was an attack on the secretary or not. His long-planned trip comes in the middle of a crisis in relations between the U.S. and Afghanistan. The U.S. is investigating the killings of 16 Afghan civilians, apparently committed by a U.S. soldier.

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