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Ex-Defense Secretary Gates Takes Aim At Obama In New Book

In Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War, Robert Gates says the president was unsure the Afghan surge would work and was openly distrustful of military leaders. "I never doubted Obama's support for the troops, only his support for their mission," he writes. The book is scheduled for release Jan. 14.
NPR

The Secret Burglary That Exposed J. Edgar Hoover's FBI

A new book reveals details of the historic 1971 burglary of an FBI office in Media, Pa., that exposed domestic surveillance abuses committed by J. Edgar Hoover's FBI. The bureau never solved the case. Now, for the first time in four decades, the people behind the burglary have told their story.
NPR

CIA Lawyer: Waterboarding Wasn't Torture Then And Isn't Torture Now

John Rizzo, who guided the CIA through more than three decades of crisis and controversy, has written a new memoir called Company Man. He talks with NPR's Renee Montagne about the origins of the infamous "enhanced interrogation techniques" that emerged after the Sept. 11 attacks.
NPR

Army Takes On Its Own Toxic Leaders

Why have so many soldiers committed suicide in recent years? The Army is looking beyond post-traumatic stress and asking whether bad commanders and destructive leadership are taking a toll.
NPR

The NSA's Quantum Code-Breaking Research Is No Secret

So the world's most clandestine spy agency is working on something called a quantum computer. It's based on rules Einstein himself described as "spooky," and it can crack almost any code. That's got to be top-secret stuff, right? Guess again.
NPR

Newspapers: 'Whistle-Blower' Snowden Deserves Clemency

The New York Times and Britain's The Guardian have published editorials saying accused spy Edward Snowden has sparked an important debate about the proper limits of electronic surveillance.
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Is U.S. Ready Rethink Sept. 11 Security Policies?

President Obama will announce this year how he wants to overhaul operations at the National Security Agency and other intelligence agencies. The NSA surveillance activities disclosed by Edward Snowden have been criticized by Congress and others. In the past, reports of intelligence abuses or failures have prompted significant changes.
NPR

Dying Lawyer Convicted Of Aiding Terrorism Leaves Prison

In 2005, Lynn Stewart was convicted of helping blind Egyptian cleric Sheik Omar Abdel Rahman communicate with followers while he was serving a life sentence for plotting to blow up New York City landmarks.
NPR

Japan's State Secrets Law: Hailed By U.S., Denounced By Japanese

Japan's tough new law protecting state secrets was a victory for Washington, which had long pressured its Asian ally to exert tighter control over classified information. But the controversial law has triggered widespread outrage in Japan and undermined the popularity of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.
NPR

'Times' Report Finds No al-Qaida Involvement In Benghazi Attack

In a 7,000-word investigative report published by The New York Times on Sunday, David Kirkpatrick revisits last year's assault on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya. Kirkpatrick finds that — contrary to much commentary from mostly Republican members of Congress — al-Qaida was not involved. He joins Robert Siegel to talk about his reporting and the backlash against his conclusions.

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