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How House Speaker Boehner Survived A Roller-Coaster Year

Speaker of the House John Boehner's year began with members of his own party trying to oust him from the speakership. Thus began a year of rocky relations with the Tea Party wing of the House Republican caucus. But by year's end, Boehner was firmly in control of his gavel.
NPR

In New Hampshire, Christmas Lights Help Welcome New Immigrants

Refugees from Iraq, Nepal and the Congo are being introduced to the way Americans celebrate the holidays — and the way Americans consume electricity.
NPR

A Late Christmas Tree May Not Be A Beauty, But It's A Tradition

Stores and families keep putting up their Christmas decorations earlier and earlier each year. But some people still hold out for decorating on Christmas Eve. Martin Kaste has this audio postcard about the difficulties faced in trying to keep Christmas at bay until Christmas.
NPR

A Vet Finds PTSD Relief With Pot, Though The Law Creates Hurdles

Ryan Begin, an injured veteran, says marijuana helped his pain and PTSD in ways that prescription drugs did not. Those drugs "drained his soul," he says. But pot brought on new complications for the Iraq vet because while six states allow the use of marijuana for PTSD, the federal government does not.
NPR

Amid Declining Popularity, The Tea Party Prepares To Fight

It's been a year of influence, resilience and determination for the tea party. But not all of its actions were successful, and it faces political battles in year ahead — not just with Democrats, but also with the GOP.
NPR

First-Class Postage Rate Will Rise To 49 Cents Next Month

Regulators authorized a temporary 3-cent increase to help the U.S. Postal Service recoup billions of dollars in losses.
NPR

'Living Wage' Effort Eclipsed By Minimum-Pay Battles

Low-wage workers in 13 states will see their minimum hourly pay increased in 2014, as state-based efforts to boost wages accelerate and federal efforts languish. Meanwhile, new "living wage" campaigns are focused on government-subsidized jobs, particularly at airports.
NPR

New Law Opens Birth Certificates, Sparks Questions

A new law lets adopted people in Ohio see their original birth certificates — but opponents say it comes at a cost to the birth parents. Guest host Celeste Headlee takes on the topic with law professor Carol Sanger, birth mother Jodi Hodges, and advocates Adam Pertman and Betsie Norris.
NPR

Diplomat's Arrest Causes US-India Strain

Since the recent arrest of Indian diplomat Devyani Khobragade, US-Indian relations have been strained. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with Deepa Iyer, Executive Director of South Asian-Americans Leading Together and Sandip Roy, Culture Editor for the Indian news site FirstPost.com.
NPR

Healthcare Rollout Mixed On Deadline Day

Another deadline for the Affordable Care Act has been pushed back. Guest Host Celeste Headlee speaks to Kaiser Health News reporter Mary Agnes Carey and Washington Post reporter Sarah Kliff and what the decision means and how the healthcare rollout is going across the country.

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