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Sunpreme: The Grape That Could Revolutionize The Raisin Industry

Harvesting grapes usually takes thousands of workers. But a new raisin grape variety bred in Central California could dramatically cut down on the need for labor.
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Reversing Opioid Overdoses Saves Lives But Isn't A Cure-All

Having police, school nurses, drug users and family equipped with kits to reverse an overdose saves lives, doctors say. But reversing addiction requires follow-up care that many users aren't getting.
NPR

California's Vineyards Pressed To Turn Less Water Into Wine

California wineries use between 2.5 and 6 gallons of water to make a gallon of wine, not including irrigation water and other needs. But drought is forcing the industry to conserve in new ways.
NPR

4 Outrageously Expensive Dinners Of The Past

Americans of the past were fascinated by luxurious dining experiences — or at least by the tales of such extravagant exploits.
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Share Your Story: What Was The Hardest Thing About Being 15?

We're on a mission to capture the collective experience of being 15 around the world. Will you join us?
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Amid Continued Negotiations, UAW Gives Fiat Chrysler A Strike Notice

If the United Automobile Workers union does strike, it would be the first against a Detroit automaker in eight years. Workers previously rejected a deal presented by union leadership and management.
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Beer Giant SABMiller Rejects $104 Billion Takeover Bid From AB InBev

"AB InBev is very substantially undervaluing SABMiller," says the chairman of SABMiller, Jan du Plessis.
NPR

Doctors Without Borders Wants Independent Inquiry Into U.S. Attack On Hospital

Twelve of those who died were staff members of the Paris-based charity, which says the attack went on for 30 minutes after it contacted both Afghanistan's and the coalition's military leaders.
NPR

'Draft Biden' Group Launches Emotional Ad Urging VP To Run

Vice President Joe Biden is still weighing whether to run for president. But a superPAC trying to draft him is upping the ante with a TV ad set to run around the time of the first Democratic debate.
NPR

Surprisingly Few Urban High School Students Take The ACT Or SAT

In 30 out of 50 cities studied in a wide-ranging new report, the rate is less than 15 percent. But the majority of four-year institutions in the U.S. still require students to take one or the other.

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