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'Innovation Districts' May Be Cornerstones Of New Urban Economy

Robert Siegel talks with Brookings Institution vice president Bruce Katz, founding director of the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program, about his new book, The Metropolitan Revolution: How Cities and Metros Are Fixing Our Broken Politics and Fragile Economy. Katz and his co-author Jennifer Bradley argue that "innovation districts," combining office space, residential buildings, and mixed-use retail, will be epicenters of the new urban economy.
NPR

Some House Republicans Optimistic About Passing Immigration Reform

The prospects for a sweeping immigration overhaul dimmed as House Republican leaders said they would not take up a comprehensive bill passed by the Senate last month. Instead, they argued for a slower, step-by-step approach. Congressman Mario Diaz-Balart (R, Fla.) tells Audie Cornish that he remains optimistic that the House can still pass a bill to fix the immigration system.
NPR

After Promising Military Aid, U.S. Sends Little To Syrian Rebels

Weeks have passed since President Obama promised aid to the Syrian rebels on a heightened scale, but there's been little evidence of such aid so far and most Americans remain opposed to a broader U.S. role in the conflict.
NPR

U.S. Wants Egypt To Have An Inclusive Political Transition

As the Obama administration slow-walks a decision on whether to call the ousting of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi a coup, which would lead to an aid cut off, U.S. officials are also in the awkward position of trying to encourage the Muslim Brotherhood to accept Morsi's ouster and return to the political process. President Obama has spoken by phone to the leader of Qatar, which had bankrolled the Morsi government. He's also been talking to Gulf leaders who were quick to step in to help Egypt after the Islamist government was toppled. The message to all is to back an inclusive and stable Egyptian system, though there are competing interests from regional players.
NPR

'A $34 Million Waste Of The Taxpayers' Money' In Afghanistan

A new U.S. facility in Afghanistan offers 64,000 square feet of space for more than 1,000 military personnel. Finished last November, it cost tens of millions of dollars. It will never be used for its intended purpose, a military inspector says, and it could be demolished.
NPR

Wastewater Wells, Geothermal Power Triggering Earthquakes

Pumping industrial wastewater into storage wells deep underground can prime nearby faults for an earthquake. And studies show that a large quake — even one on the other side of the planet — can also push faults over the edge and set off a swarm of mini-earthquakes.
NPR

Anonymous Person Posts $500,000 Bond To Free Texas Teen

Justin Carter, a 19-year-old Texas gamer who was arrested for writing Facebook messages about a school shooting, is out on bail.
NPR

Taste Of Grandma's Kitchen: We Hack An Old Ketchup Recipe

Jim Ledvinka grew up outside of Chicago watching his grandmother make ketchup from scratch once a year. As a kid, he hated the stuff. As a man — and now a grandfather — he became desperate to re-create it. That's where All Things Considered's Found Recipes project comes in.
NPR

Report: Microsoft Helped NSA, FBI Get Around Encryption

The latest Guardian report on U.S. electronic surveillance says the company granted accesses to email and chat services.
NPR

For Youths, Fewer Homicides But Still Many Deaths

Homicide rates have dropped among youths, mirroring a decline in crime overall. But almost 5,000 young people were killed in 2010, and researchers say there's no clear evidence on what works best to prevent those deaths.

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