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Why Is Food Stamp Usage Rising So Fast?

Robert Siegel speaks with John Davis, the director of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, in Mississippi. He talks about the numbers and nature of recipients in his state. While the program is targeted at people who need help for a limited time period while they transition from unemployment back to employment, many people are using it indefinitely.
NPR

Stranded Travelers Save Samaritan After Heart Attack

Two women were stranded Saturday night on a Wisconsin highway when a man stopped to change their flat tire. Driving off, the 61-year-old man said, "Someone up above put me in the right place at the right time." Moments later the man had a heart attack. The women spotted his car down the road and they pulled over to assist him.
NPR

Remembering Joe Frazier And An Epic Boxing Rivalry

The man nicknamed "Smokin' Joe" was one of the greatest heavyweights in history, and his three fights in the 1970s with bitter rival Muhammad Ali are part of boxing lore. Frazier died Monday in Philadelphia at age 67.
NPR

Tea Party Looks To Recapture Election Magic In 2012

It was one year ago that the Tea Party movement helped Republicans take control of the U.S. House of Representatives. With the presidential election a year away, the movement finds itself searching for ways to have the same kind of impact this time around.
NPR

Some Local Businesses Hurting Without NBA Assist

The NBA's ongoing lockout affects the hometown cities in different ways. While most large cities with a professional basketball team can attract fans with other professional sports, in places like Oklahoma City, businesses suffer as a result. Economists estimate each lost game is a million-dollar hit to the city's economy.
NPR

Do Police Need Warrants For GPS Tracking Devices?

The Supreme Court weighs whether police must get a warrant from a judge before they can attach such a device to a car so they can monitor a suspect's every movement for an indefinite period of time. The case could have enormous implications for privacy rights in the information age.
NPR

Wal-Mart Heiress Brings Art Museum To The Ozarks

This week, Wal-Mart heiress Alice Walton is opening the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in her hometown of Bentonville, Ark. But some are having trouble separating the retail giant, which is also headquartered in Bentonville, from the cultural attraction.
NPR

Supreme Court Declines Duane Buck Death Row Case

The U.S. Supreme Court has declined to hear the case of Texas death row inmate Duane Buck, who alleged that race played an improper role in his death sentence. In September, the Court issued a rare stay of execution while it considered the merits of the case. Monday's action lifts the stay and allows the state to set a new execution date.

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