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What Facebook IPO May Mean For Small Investors

The social network filed to go public, hoping to raise $5 billion in a huge IPO. The markets are buzzing, but what might it mean for an individual investor? Melissa Block gets the story on high profile IPO's work from Evelyn Rusli, DealBook reporter at the New York Times.
NPR

The Future Of America's Manufacturing Jobs

More and more factory work in the United States is being done by machines, and the industry increasingly relies on highly skilled workers. NPR's Adam Davidson explores the shifts in the manufacturing industry, and Tim Aeppel of the Wall Street Journal discusses the implications for the U.S. economy.
NPR

Mike Pesca's Guide To Super Bowl XLVI

The New York Giants face the New England Patriots in the NFL Super Bowl XLVI on Sunday. In 2008, the underdog Giants beat the Patriots 17-14. NPRs Mike Pesca preview's the nation's biggest sporting event and talks about what to expect from the 2012 rematch.
NPR

Obama, Perhaps Tweaking Romney, Emphasizes Duty To Poor In Speech

Obama made a number of statements grounded in the religious imperative to help the poor. It's not surprising that he would make such observations at a prayer breakfast. But there appeared to be more of an emphasis on society's obligation to the poor in Thursday's version of the prayer breakfast speech than in the past.
NPR

Computerized Tests For Concussions May Be Unreliable

Computerized testing of athletes for concussion isn't a reliable gauge of their brain health or fitness to return to play, according to new research. The computerized tests are used in the NFL and NHL, and in many colleges and high schools.
NPR

Clean-Tech Industry Facing Lean Times After Solyndra

The once-booming clean-tech industry is facing hard times, in part because of cheaper natural gas, the effects of the financial crisis, China's growing solar industry and the Solyndra bankruptcy. Reporter Juliet Eilperin, who covers the industry's struggles in Wired's February issue, explains.
NPR

Getting America's Dropouts Back On Track

Nearly a quarter of U.S. public high school students fail to graduate on time, or at all. The president wants a rule requiring students to stay in school until age 18. But even with the requirement, Washington, D.C. has one of the lowest graduation rates. Host Michel Martin speaks with WAMU's Kavitha Cardoza and former dropout, Rashida Harris.

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