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From South Africa, Lessons In 'Soft Vengeance'

South African Constitutional Court Justice Albie Sachs discusses how a once-divided nation can abandon the impulse to avenge past wrongs and, instead, come together to build a new democracy. One of the framers of the country's constitution, Sachs also mulls over just what it means to determine the "intent" of a nation's founding fathers.
NPR

English Teacher Reaches Through Student's Haze

NPR correspondent John Burnett's high school English teacher, Christine Eastus, may have been demanding, but she encouraged his interest in writing. Burnett is thankful that Eastus gave him the boost he needed as a teenager. You can thank a teacher, too, on Twitter with #thankteacher, or on the StoryCorps Facebook page.
NPR

Bachmann's 'Conviction' To Fixing Government

After a meteoric rise, GOP presidential candidate Michele Bachmann is now polling in the single digits. But she's still plowing ahead with her campaign and this week she came out with a memoir. The Minnesota Congresswoman talks with co-host Steve Inskeep about Core of Conviction and aiming to win the nomination.
NPR

Racist History Of American News Media?

The new book News for All the People traces how mainstream publishers and broadcasters perpetuated racism through their coverage, but also how journalists of color fought to develop a more democratic, alternative press. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with the authors about their work and where the internet stands in diversifying news.
NPR

Reviving The 'Motown Of Cleveland'

The Boddie Record Company, founded by Louise Boddie and her husband was one of the first African-American owned record companies in Cleveland, Ohio. It had been relatively obscure until record collector Dante Carfagna and the Numero Group assembled a box set of the Boddie recordings. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with Carfagna and Louise Boddie.
NPR

English Prof. Helps Rewrite Student's Self Image

Friday is National Day of Listening, and this year, Story Corps is focusing on the impact teachers have made. Regular Tell Me More contributor Lester Spence speaks with his University of Michigan professor, Ralph Story, whose guidance helped him believe in his potential.
NPR

Collecting Oral Histories Of Jim Crow

Decades ago, Duke University students and professors did more than 1,000 interviews with African-Americans who lived through the Jim Crow era. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with two professors involved with the project. (Advisory: This segment contains language that may not be suitable for all audiences.)
NPR

Treatment, Not Jail, For Low Level Drug Crimes

A pilot program in Seattle, Wash., and surrounding King County allows some low-level drug offenders to go to rehabilitation programs instead of prison. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with King County's sheriff, a public defender and a member of the Seattle police department about the bi-partisan plan.
NPR

How Private Is Your Email? It Depends

The law that governs the privacy of cloud computing was written 25 years ago, when the concept of storing emails and other data away from the personal computer wasn't the norm. Some big-name tech companies are asking Congress to step in and clarify Americans' online privacy rights.

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