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With Federal Cases, Who Decides When To Try?

Robert Siegel speaks with George Washington law professor Steve Saltzburg about how federal prosecutors decide which cases to pursue. He says despite limited resources, U.S. Attorneys pursue cases against famous people like Roger Clemens and John Edwards precisely because they are in the public eye.
NPR

'Boring' And 'Dull,' Ho-Hum Sister Cities At Last

The communities of Boring, Oregon and Dull, Scotland have discovered one another and are seeking to become "sister" communities. Their respective names have amused visitors in the past and they believe officially linking their names will be a boon to both communities. Robert Siegel speaks with Stephen Bates of the Boring Community Planning Organization and Tom Pringle, secretary of the Dull Community Council.
NPR

Also At The Supreme Court This Week: The Case Of The Sidewalk Snafu

After arguments on Arizona's show-me-your-papers law, it was more than a little odd that the Supreme Court police — for the first time anyone could recall — asked reporters to show their IDs to get into a roped-off area where TV cameras routinely set up. Here's an explanation of what happened.
NPR

Colorado Extends Medicaid To Some Adults Without Kids

The state is one of just a few that is expanding Medicaid ahead of a major expansion called for in 2014 by the federal health law. Though the state estimates that 50,000 people meet the income bar, Colorado will only be able to offer coverage to 10,000 people.
NPR

Nutella Maker May Settle Deceptive Ad Lawsuit For $3 Million

It might be hard to imagine anyone believing that Nutella, the sweet chocolate-hazelnut spread is good for you. But the company's agreed to settle claims that its ads made it seem healthier than it is.
NPR

Sybrina Fulton: 'I Can Wait A Year' For Justice

The mother of Trayvon Martin tells NPR she has "a hole" in her heart after the death of her son, an unarmed Florida teenager who was killed in February. His shooter, George Zimmerman, was freed on bail this week and awaits trial on a second-degree murder charge.
NPR

Is Bribery 'Business As Usual' South Of Border?

Mexican officials are probing allegations that Wal-Mart paid $24 million in bribes to speed construction of new stores there. Wal-Mart has also been accused of lobbying to amend U.S. anti-bribery laws. Host Michel Martin talks with reporter Ana Maria Salazar, who says even big companies have to grease the wheels in Mexico.
NPR

Boehner: House Will Vote On Student Loans

The House is set to vote Friday on a GOP proposal to keep some student loan interest rates at current levels. Many students have been concerned at news that the current 3.4 percent rate could double if Congress fails to extend the 2007 College Cost Reduction and Access Act. Host Michel Martin talks with Jason Delisle of the New America Foundation.

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