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Possible U.S. Troop Withdrawal Plan Worries Afghan Officials

The U.S. and Afghanistan have spent months discussing a long-term security pact that would keep as many as 10,000 U.S. troops in Afghanistan for years to come. But the New York Times and Reuters are reporting that President Obama is now considering removing all troops from Afghanistan by the end of next year. Afghan parliamentarians and officials are reacting with anger — mostly towards President Hamid Karzai. Officials say Afghanistan needs U.S. troops to stay beyond 2014 to prevent the collapse of a fragile security situation, and they blame Karzai for playing games and pushing Obama to the brink.
NPR

FBI Confirmation Hearing Reopens Debate Over Surveillance

James Comey, the president's choice for FBI director, had a relatively easy time fielding questions Tuesday at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Lawmakers wanted to know about surveillance, waterboarding and other controversial issues, but they posed their questions gently.
NPR

Former FISA Judge Questions Court's Approval Of Surveillance

A former judge for the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court raised questions about the court's approval of government data collection programs on Tuesday. He was testifying before the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board, an independent agency considering recently uncovered surveillance efforts.
NPR

Questions Remain In Deaths Of 19 Wildland Firefighters

A public memorial service was held in Prescott, Ariz., on Tuesday for the 19 firefighters killed battling the Yarnell Hill Fire.
NPR

Dollar-Euro Exchange Rate Can Reveal Pulse Of Global Economy

We examine how the exchange rate between the Euro and the U.S. dollar reflects the health of the global economy.
NPR

Pilots Have Extensive Training Before Flying New Aircraft

We have the latest from the National Transportation Safety Board on its investigation of the Asiana jet crash in San Francisco.
NPR

Uncovering The Mystery Behind An Atlantic Tsunami

Scientists in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are still trying to understand what exactly caused a tsunami to strike the East Coast in June. There was no seismic record of the incident. But a team of scientists came together to analyze tidal and weather data. They believe the tsunami may have been caused by a weather phenomenon known as a "derecho."
NPR

Affordable Care Act Hits More Road Bumps

It seems yet another glitch is forcing a delay in a piece of the health law. This time it's how much more insurers can charge smokers. Coupled with last week's announcements of other delays, could there be trouble ahead for the law?
NPR

A Coup Or Not? Semantics Could Affect Us Aid To Egypt

Was the change in Egypt's government a coup or not? For members of Congress, the difference is more than a question of semantics. U.S. law requires that aid be cut off to a country that undergoes a military coup — which, if it were to happen in the case of Egypt, would bring on dramatic consequences.
NPR

Sen. Levin: U.S. Aid To Egypt Should Be Suspended

Robert Siegel talks to Sen. Carl Levin, chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, about suspending U.S. aid to Egypt.

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