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Drafted To Fight For The Country That Hurt Him

Ruben Aguilar, 85, was forcibly deported with his family from the U.S. to Mexico at six. While his parents were not American citizens, he was, and at 18, he was drafted by the U.S. Army. Aguilar is a man who "got hurt by his country, came back to this country and is going to die in his country."

NYC's Fast-Food Workers Strike, Demand 'Living Wages'

Fast-food workers in New York City are on strike for the second time in six months, demanding higher wages that they can live on. Workers complain that $7.25 an hour, New York's current minimum wage, is not enough to live in the city.

UCLA Program Hopes To Recruit More Latin American Doctors

A quarter of doctors in the U.S. are foreign-born. Most of them are from places like India and the Middle East. But few are from Latin American countries, despite their close proximity to the border. Jenny Gold has this story about a program at UCLA trying to change that.

Oregon Weighs Own Gun Measures After Mall Shooting, Newtown

The measures include a ban on guns in schools and criminal background checks for private gun sales. They follow a shooting at a crowded shopping mall in a Portland suburb just days before the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut.

States Head In Different Directions On Gun Legislation

Robert Siegel talks with Jack Nicas of the Wall Street Journal. They cover a round-up of state gun laws that have been passed since last year's school shooting in Newtown, Conn.

Structural Or Cyclical? The Type Of Unemployment Matters

Every week, the Department of Labor issues data detailing the number of people who filed for unemployment benefits in the previous week. According to Thursday's report, 385,000 people filed last week, the third weekly increase in a row, and a higher figure than expected. Robert Siegel talks with Adam Davidson about this week's initial claims report. Davidson says the report can help illuminate the vital question of whether the United States has a cyclical or a structural unemployment problem.

For Pulitzer-Winning Critic Roger Ebert, Films Were A Journey

He was a print journalist initially, but Ebert's "thumbs up" TV critiques were just as influential as his essays, and he later carved out a prodigious digital presence. Ebert died Thursday after struggling for years with cancer. He was 70 years old.

Study: Record Number Of People Are Cohabitating

More and more Americans are opting to live together before they get married. That's according to new federal data. And on average, cohabitations last about 22 months compared to 13 months in 1995.

Previous Owner Revisits Home Lost To Foreclosure

Bank foreclosures often force people out of their homes. Some houses re-sell, and new people move in. Five years ago, NPR's Emily Harris bought a house that sold in foreclosure. An evening ring at her doorbell led her to meet the person who had lived there before.