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Zimmerman Makes First Court Appearance In Fla.

George Zimmerman made his first court appearance on Thursday afternoon in Sanford, Fla. Wearing a blue jail outfit and handcuffs, Zimmerman uttered just two words — "yes, sir" — when asked if he had an attorney. Zimmerman was arrested on Wednesday and charged with second-degree murder in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin.
NPR

Lawyer Follows News Corp. Hacking To U.S.

British attorney Mark Lewis was the driving force in lawsuits that cracked open the News Corp. phone hacking scandal in the U.K. Now he's in the U.S. pursuing similar cases against the company here.
NPR

Romney Scores Key Endorsements From Anti-Abortion Groups

While running for Massachusetts governor, Mitt Romney vowed to "preserve and protect" abortion rights. On Thursday, the presumptive GOP presidential nominee won the endorsement of the nation's largest anti-abortion group, whose president said: "The pro-life movement is filled with converts."
NPR

The DOJ E-Book Lawsuit: Is It 1934 All Over Again?

The Department of Justice's lawsuit against Apple and five major publishers for e-book price fixing sent shivers through the industry — but Jason Boog says this fraught relationship between American publishers, retailers and the DOJ goes back to the Great Depression.
NPR

We Stand At The Doorstep Of A Foreclosed House. Then We Go In

We tag along with a real estate agent whose job is to investigate a foreclosed house in Florida.
NPR

Federal Government To Pay Indian Tribes $1 Billion Over Mismanagement

The U.S. government will pay more than $1 billion to settle lawsuits filed by 41 American Indian tribes, who had accused federal agencies of mismanaging tribal money and resources. The agreement ends nearly two years of negotiations; some claims date back more than 100 years.
NPR

The Bacon Sundae: Brilliant Or Tragic?

Burger King's new dessert is available at a limited number of locations. It is just the latest example of a fast food chain following a trend that high-end eateries embraced years ago.
NPR

Cities — But Not Their Citizens — Really Are Meaner

Casey Neistat set up a camera and pretended to steal his own bike several times around New York City. Bystanders didn't intervene. In a recent piece for Salon.com, Will Doig cites this as just one example in his argument that cities are meaner places to live.

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