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Back To The Future: Seattle's Space Needle Turns 50

Originally built as a tourist attraction for the 1962 World's Fair, the Needle's design was inspired by an abstract sculpture of a dancer. As the city celebrates the structure's golden anniversary, the Jetsons-era tower is getting a fresh coat of paint to return to its original glow. "You still kind of believe in that future," says one fan.
NPR

Alleged $30M Theft By Comptroller Stuns Ill. City

The longtime treasurer of the small city of Dixon is accused of stealing more than $30 million from city coffers over the past six years. Federal prosecutors say she used the funds to finance a lavish lifestyle that included a world-class horse-breeding operation and a $2 million luxury motor home.
NPR

New Rules To Curb Pollution From Oil, Gas Drilling

The federal rules announced Wednesday will, among other things, soon require oil and natural gas drillers to limit air pollution from drilling operations. Though the requirements stand to save companies money long term, producers say pollution regulations should be left to the states.
NPR

Panetta Condemns Latest U.S. Troop Photo Scandal

Newly-published photos show U.S. troops in Afghanistan posing with the dead bodies of insurgents. The incident, first reported by The Los Angeles Times, occurred in 2010. It's the latest setback for the military's counterinsurgency strategy, which depends on winning the hearts and minds of the Afghan people.
NPR

Dick Clark, 'Bandstand' Host, Dies At 82

For more than 50 years, "the world's oldest teenager" was one of pop culture's most familiar figures.
NPR

Where's the Line Between Profiling, Policing?

Host Michel Martin speaks with Illinois Senator Dick Durbin, who chaired the first Senate hearing on Tuesday about racial profiling since before 9/11. The controversies surrounding the killing of Trayvon Martin and revelations that New York Police monitored Muslim groups served as the backdrop. Martin is also joined by NPR's Carrie Johnson.

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