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Before Deep Space, NASA Heads Deep Under Water

NASA may have retired its shuttles, but it has its sights on sending astronauts deeper into space than ever before. The agency wants to set foot on asteroids, but the first step is a soggy one.
NPR

Southern Farmers See Midwestern Bias In Farm Bill

The Senate version of the bill aims to do away with direct payments to farmers by expanding crop insurance programs. Some Georgia farmers say that will favor Midwestern farmers and leave those in the South without a safety net.
NPR

Help And Hope, From Soldiers, For Soldiers

Like most members of the military returning from deployment, members of the Army National Guard's 182nd Infantry Regiment face a tough return to life back home. A program developed by the military offers assistance from job fairs to couples counseling, but it's often the last help soldiers get.
NPR

Return To Alcatraz: Will A Legend End After 50 Years?

One of the most daring prison escapes in U.S. history happened 50 years ago Monday. Legend has always held that if the three men who escaped from Alcatraz are still alive, they will return on this anniversary. Unlikely as it seems, NPR's Laura Sullivan — and the U.S. Marshals — plan to be there.
NPR

They Rose In Protest, Now Kansas Arts Groups Cheer

Last year, Kansas became the first state in the nation to completely eliminate arts funding. That started an uproar that pushed Gov. Sam Brownback to restore some funding, but arts organizations still face uncertainty.
NPR

Could 'Taxmageddon' Crisis Create Compromise?

On Jan. 1, trillions of dollars in spending cuts and tax increases — called Taxmageddon — will take effect unless Congress and the White House can agree on a new plan. Many economists say the country will fall back into a recession if it happens. Former Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin says Congress may actually be "forced to make a decision that affects taxes and spending."
NPR

A Damned Dam On The Penobscot River

Conservation groups, Native Americans and Maine's power company fought over the fate of the Penobscot River for 13 years. They finally reached an agreement that should preserve hydropower while improving the river's environmental and recreational offerings.

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