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U.S. Students Slide In Global Ranking On Math, Reading, Science

American 15-year-olds scored below average in math among the world's most-developed countries, according to rankings released every three years. They were close to average in science and reading.
NPR

Independent Bookstores Offer 'Cider Monday'

They invited customers to step away from their computers and stop by for a free cup of apple cider. The celebration was first proposed by The Toadstool Bookshops in New Hampshire. They promised their "servers" wouldn't be overloaded.
NPR

How 2013 Became The Greatest Year In Gay Rights History

From the White House and the Supreme Court on down, gay rights advocates have won a string of victories this year. Many Americans remain opposed to same-sex marriage, but support for gays and gay marriage has been rising — particularly among young people.
NPR

Why FISA Court Judges Rule The Way They Do

Newly disclosed court opinions and statements from the Obama administration raise big questions about whether the National Security Agency's surveillance programs are too complicated for anyone to understand or oversee. Self-policing comes with big challenges. Is it possible to control the vast spy agency?
NPR

More Employees Agree To Fragmented Hours To Get Work

The economy adds a decent number of jobs every month but there are big questions about the quality of some of those jobs. Many people getting hired these days do not have anything resembling a regular schedule and work fragmented and unpredictable hours.
NPR

PISA Test Results For U.S. Students Are 'Sobering'

International standardized test scores have been released. The test is given to students around the world every three years. It measures their knowledge of reading, mathematics and science literacy. U.S. students usually turn in mediocre performances, and this year's scores were no different.
NPR

Cyber Monday Sales Up From Last Year

Millions of consumers went online to get a crack at shopping deals for Cyber Monday. Online sales were $2 billion for the one day — up nearly 20 percent over the same time last year.
NPR

As Rent Soars, Longtime San Francisco Tenants Fight To Stay

Another tech boom has brought an influx of money and new residents to San Francisco, and people who have long called the city home are being evicted from their apartments. Tenants and community organizers are demanding that the city do something to stop residents from being pushed out.
NPR

A Supreme Court Fight For The Rights Of (Frequent) Fliers

What rights do participants in an airline's frequent-flier plan have to their miles or points? That's the question before the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday, when the justices examine whether, and under what circumstances, frequent fliers can sue in these disputes.
NPR

Could A Tech Giant Build A Better Health Exchange? Maybe Not

Since the rollout of HealthCare.gov, many have wondered whether a private company could have avoided the federal site's many pitfalls. Oregon took that route, hiring Silicon Valley titan Oracle to create its state insurance exchange. But two months after its scheduled launch, the website is still not working.

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