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Reading Between The Polls: What Voters Should Watch

Early polling can do much to shape political campaigns, but for voters who are just trying to follow the debate, polls and surveys can seem contradictory and confusing. Host Scott Simon talks with Michael Dimock of Pew Research Center and J. Ann Selzer, president of Selzer and Company, about how to make sense of polling this election season.
NPR

Residents Expect New Orleans Paper Cut To Hurt

The Times-Picayune of New Orleans announced this week it would stop publishing seven days a week. The paper has a rich heritage and is widely loved in New Orleans. As Eileen Fleming of member station WWNO reports, when Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005, the paper continued to report despite danger and days-long power outages.
NPR

Harvard Diversity Stats Put Warren In Hot Seat Again

In Massachusetts, Democratic Senate candidate and Harvard Law Professor Elizabeth Warren continues to be dogged by the question of her American Indian heritage. Friday, in the wake of a report from The Boston Globe, Republican Sen. Scott Brown accused Warren of misleading Harvard about her Native American ethnicity. From member station WBUR in Boston, Fred Thys reports.
NPR

A Holiday Treat: Lower Prices At The Pump

If you're one of millions of motorists on the roads this holiday weekend, you may have noticed something unexpected and welcome: Gas prices are falling. Host Scott Simon talks with Daniel Yergin, chairman of HIS Cambridge Energy Research Associates about the trend.
NPR

Sports: Ice, Hoops And Rackets

The Stanley Cup finals are set, the NBA playoffs feature a thrilling matchup between Texas and Oklahoma, and the French Open, uh, opens. Host Scott Simon catches up on the week in sports with NPR's Tom Goldman.
NPR

Delayed At The Airport? They're Working On It

The FAA is hoping to make some delays a thing of the past. It's developing what it calls "NextGen" technology to modernize the air traffic control system, transforming it from radar to GPS-based technology.
NPR

Chicago Ward Gives Budgetary Power To The People

The alderman in the 49th Ward became the first elected official in the country to hand over the purse strings to his constituents in 2009. Three years later, the "participatory budgeting" experiment is still attracting new residents to planning meetings.
NPR

Tenacious Prosecutor Leaves Chicago A Little Cleaner

After more than a decade busting corruption, Patrick Fitzgerald is stepping down. The federal prosecutor, known as "Eliot Ness with a Harvard degree," went after the Gambino crime family, al-Qaida and even the White House — not to mention two former Illinois governors who are now in jail.

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