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When The Right To Religion Conflicts With A Changing Society

Nuns sue to avoid contraceptive coverage. A baker refuses to make a cake for a same-sex wedding. These ongoing battles bring into question the scope of the right to religious liberty in America. Where do one person's rights end and another's begin?
NPR

A New Rule For The Workplace: 'Hug Sparingly'

Research psychologist Peggy Drexler is calling for an end to the "hugging arms race," particularly at work. She has ways for non-huggers to avoid an unwanted embrace without feeling awkward.
NPR

Lieutenant Governors Make Headlines — For All The Wrong Reasons

Over the past year, four lieutenant governors have resigned amid scandal. Lieutenant governors may not have much power, but they're certainly capable of getting into trouble.
NPR

The War Over Poverty: A Deep Divide On How To Help

On the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon Johnson's "War on Poverty" speech, the clash between Republicans and Democrats on how to alleviate poverty has come front and center. Republicans insist that anti-poverty programs have failed; Democrats say they have worked and should be expanded.
NPR

The Cigarette's Powerful Cultural Allure

Nearly 20 percent of Americans still smoke, in spite of what we know about the dangers. Part of the reason is the allure of a cigarette, so elemental to classic scenes in movies, television shows and books. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Richard Klein, author of Cigarettes are Sublime, about smoking and American culture.
NPR

Will The Colts Run Out Of Luck Against Patriots?

Saturday's NFL playoffs pits Tom Brady's Patriots against the Colts and the Seahawks against the Saints. Over on the other side of the world, will Serena serve herself into history — again? NPR's Scott Simon talks with Howard Bryant of ESPN.com and ESPN the Magazine, about the sports stories of the week and sports to come.
NPR

Gates Memoir Tests Civilian-Military Rules Of Engagement

In Duty, former Defense Secretary Robert Gates writes that the Obama team was always "suspicious" of the military and never trusted senior leaders. The memoir is a case study in a long-standing cultural divide between the White House and the military.
NPR

50 Years After Surgeon General's Warning, Smokers Still Light Up

In the 50 years since the Surgeon General's landmark report on smoking, what's worked to convince people not to smoke, and what hasn't? NPR's Scott Simon talks with Kenneth Warner, professor of public health at the University of Michigan, about cigarette consumption before and after the report.
NPR

December Jobs Report Has Analysts Flummoxed

The U.S. economy gained just 74,000 jobs in December, according to a disappointing report released by the Labor Department on Friday. Economists had been expecting nearly three times as many jobs. At the same time, the unemployment rate fell slightly, to 6.7 percent. It's not that more jobs were created, though — many of the long-term unemployed just stopped looking.
NPR

Historic House Is Yours Free, But There's A Catch

In an effort to save a tiny 1920s Sears kit house from demolition, architects are offering it free to anyone who can move it to another property. Current owners of the Arlington, Va., plot want to build a bigger home where the kit house stands.

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