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Court: FCC Can't Enforce Net Neutrality

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit has struck down a provision of the Federal Communications Commission's "Open Internet Rules." That provision allowed the FCC to regulate Internet service providers in much the same way it regulates phone service providers — requiring them to provide unrestricted service to all users.
NPR

Long-Term Unemployed Say N.C. Law Is Unfair

President Obama heads to Raleigh, N.C., and is expected to call on Congress to try again to extend federal unemployment benefits. Republicans blocked a Senate bill that would have restored the benefits that ended last month for 1.3 million Americans. In North Carolina, a state law has prevented people from getting the benefits since July 1.
NPR

Husband Fined For Using Stun Gun On His Wife

Nicole and John Grant stopped by a Wisconsin bar to watch the Green Bay Packers play the Chicago Bears. Nicole Grant told her husband, "If the Packers lose, you can shoot me with your stun gun." When the Packers lost, John Grant took her at her word.
NPR

Minn. Orchestra And Union Musicians End Extensive Lockout

The Minnesota Orchestra hasn't performed in its concert hall in Minneapolis in 488 days. The musicians and orchestra management have been locked in a bitter labor dispute. But on Tuesday, musicians agreed to a new contract ending the longest work stoppage for any symphony orchestra in U.S. history.
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'Pretty Good' Budget Deal Looks Good Enough To Avoid Shutdown

The so-called "omnibus" package of all 12 annual spending bills has more money in it than what Congressional Republicans wanted, but less than what President Obama had asked for. There is some disappointment with the measure on both sides of the aisle, but this time nobody is talking about forcing another government shutdown.
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Supreme Court Considers Legality Of Abortion Clinic Buffer Zones

Do boundaries meant to protect patients and staff outside abortion clinics violate the free speech rights of anti-abortion protesters? In 2000, the Supreme Court said no in a case involving "floating" buffer zones. But the issue is back before the court — which now has more conservative justices.
NPR

A Woman Comes To Terms With Her Family's Slave-Owning Past

Kate Byroade had always known her ancestors were slave owners, but she had been told their slaves were treated well. Understanding the truth took her on a difficult lifelong journey. Americans are shy "about calling out the great wickedness of slavery," she says. "We should not be."
NPR

Women's Team Sports: Where Is The Love?

Commentator Frank Deford ponders why individual women's sports continue to be popular fare, while women's team sports simply never manage to attract much attention, let alone success.
NPR

Soon To Be Big In Japan, Jim Beam's Roots To Stay In Kentucky

In a deal worth some $16 billion, Japanese beverage giant Suntory is buying Beam Inc., maker of Jim Beam bourbon and owner of well-known American brands such as Maker's Mark. Industry leaders say it's a reflection of bourbon's exploding popularity in Asian markets, but some wonder if the new owners will preserve bourbon's Kentucky heritage.
NPR

5 Takeaways From The Omnibus Spending Bill

Regular order. That phrase refers to Congress conducting business in a methodical way, like it used to back before "dysfunctional" came to seem an official description of Washington. A new federal budget working its way through Congress could help restore regular order to Capitol Hill.

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