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Scranton's Public Workers Now Paid Minimum Wage

The Pennsylvania city has slashed the pay for all its public employees — including firefighters and police — to $7.25 per hour. Mayor Chris Doherty says there isn't enough money in the bank to pay full wages.
NPR

Economy's In Low Gear, But Obama's Bus Keeps Rolling

President Obama spent the last two days on the road, campaigning in Ohio and Pennsylvania. NPR's Scott Horsley wraps up the president's trip and his effort to put a positive spin on the monthly job creation numbers and jobless rate.
NPR

Adjustments Behind The Numbers Shape Job News

Employers added 80,000 jobs in June, fewer than expected. It appears that hiring has slowed considerably after starting the year at a healthy clip. But as NPR's Sonari Glinton explains monthly payroll numbers aren't always reliable.
NPR

Anchorage Mayor Takes Oath Under Hawaiian Sun

Monday, Dan Sullivan was sworn in for a second term as the mayor of Anchorage, Alaska. Host Scott Simon speaks with Sullivan about his decision to take the oath of office via Skype from Honolulu, Hawaii.
NPR

CEO Spill The Beans On Hiring Hesitancy

Host Scott Simon speaks with two CEOs about why more companies aren't hiring. Christopher M. Gorman is president of Key Corporate Bank and CEO of KeyBank in Cleveland. Lynn Ann Casey is the CEO of Arc Aspicio.
NPR

USS Iowa's Guns Are Now For Show

The battleship ferried Franklin Roosevelt to a historic meeting during World War II and parried Russians in the Cold War. Now the USS Iowa is setting course for a second life as a museum.
NPR

'Social Welfare' Organizations Play Big Role In Presidential Politics

Some of the heaviest advertisers are groups financed by anonymous donors. They're not organized as political committees, but as "social welfare" organizations. One of those groups, led by GOP strategist Karl Rove, is rivaling the campaigns themselves for ad money spent so far in the election.
NPR

How One Drought Changed Texas Agriculture Forever

Texas farmers were boggled in the 1950s when rain refused to fall for seven years. Crops and livestock suffered from the drought, which later spurred water planning initiatives so the state could survive in the event of another dry spell. Some growers still recall what's colloquially called "the drouth."

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