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Judge Tosses Suit Alleging NYPD Illegally Spied On Muslims

U.S. District Judge William Martini said the spying was aimed at preventing terrorism and did not amount to profiling based on religion.
NPR

Scientist Switches Position, Now Supports Keystone XL Pipeline

Opponents of the Keystone XL Pipeline lost an ally. David Greene talks to Marcia McNutt, one of the country's most influential scientists, about her decision to no longer oppose the pipeline.
NPR

Girl Scouts Frown On Outsourcing Cookie Sales

Sometimes the job of selling cookies is outsourced to parents, and a recent opinion article in The Washington Post criticized that practice. It says parents should sell with their kids not for them.
NPR

Obama To Enlist Democratic Governors' Support

Thursday at fundraising dinner, President Obama told Democratic governors that their Republican counterparts are making it harder for people to get health insurance or exercise their right to vote.
NPR

Trader Joe's Caught In Sticky Lawsuit Over Peanut Butter Pretzels

Creating the salty-sweet snack was a bit of a technological marvel. And the company that claims to have invented it says Trader Joe's has unfairly cut it out of the pretzel marketplace.
NPR

As Deadline Nears, State Insurance Exchanges Still A Mixed Bag

Some of the 14 states running their own health insurance marketplaces lag behind the federal site in meeting enrollment goals. States doing better kept the IT goals relatively simple, reviewers say.
NPR

The Lives Of Blind Brothers Changed When 'Dad' Came Knocking

Leo, Nick and Steven are triplets whose single mother had a hard time caring for them. Their lives changed when a blind man in their community heard about their situation.
NPR

Duke: $60,000 A Year For College Is Actually A Discount

"We're investing on average about $90,000 in the education of each student," says a university official. Where exactly is all that money going?
NPR

Maryland Bill May Require Holocaust Reparations From Rail Company

SNCF, whose subsidiary is bidding on a $6 billion light rail project in Maryland, transported thousands of victims to concentration camps in Nazi-occupied France. The company says it's not obligated.
NPR

For Abused Native American Women, New Law Provides A 'Ray Of Hope'

Starting Thursday, three American Indian tribes can prosecute non-Indians for some domestic violence crimes. The change stems from a provision included in the Violence Against Women Act.

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