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Charges Are Dropped In Florida Cyberbullying Case

The two girls drew the authorities' attention in September, after a 12-year-old girl who had been taunted and bullied jumped to her death. Police say that the girls will receive counseling.
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Filibuster Vote Marks Escalation In D.C.'s Partisan Wars

By changing the Senate rules to require a simple majority instead of a supermajority for most nominations, Democrats acted on a threat each party has aimed at the other for nearly a decade.
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A Quick History Of Filibuster Flip-Flops

The key players involved in the debate over the so-called nuclear option appear to be singing a different tune on the issue. What changed? The party in power.
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Filibuster Changes Could Be Most Apparent In Federal Courts

The president will be able to fill the positions needed to run the executive branch as he wants. But a more long-term benefit for President Obama will come in the federal courts, where he has been stymied more than any other modern president.
NPR

Prepare For Cabin Noise: FCC May End Ban On Phones During Flights

The Federal Communications Commission is proposing a change to allow travelers to make phone calls as they fly on jetliners in the U.S. The agency's new chairman, Tom Wheeler, calls the current ban on the use of cellphones during flights "outdated and restrictive."
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Moved By Kennedy's Death, The Boston Symphony Played On

The orchestra was mid-performance when news of the president's assassination reached the symphony hall in 1963. The musicians had to decide: suspend the concert or continue? Their decision transformed a moment of shock into a moment of shared consolation.
NPR

Unrelenting Poverty Leads To 'Desperation' In Philly Schools

Close to 40 percent of kids in Philadelphia live in poverty — but discussion of the link between poverty and student achievement is almost absent from an ongoing debate to fix schools. Public health and education experts say poverty and hunger undermine children's development.
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'Nuclear Option' Vote Marks Tectonic Shift In Senate Rules

The real reason Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid changed the rules Thursday was the proliferation of the filibuster's use — and the near-total separation of the tactic from any real objections to the nominee being blocked.
NPR

Dow Jones Index Closes Above 16,000 For First Time

After gaining 109 points Thursday, the Dow Jones industrial average closed above 16,000 for the first time in history. The index touched the mark earlier this week but fell short by day's end.
NPR

Marking Kennedy Assassination, Dallas Still On 'Eggshells'

Dallas became known as the "City of Hate" after President John F. Kennedy was killed there. But the city has changed, and it hopes that the 50th anniversary of the assassination on Friday will be a chance to show the extent of that transformation.

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