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Gymnast's Journey: Toddler Tumbler To Golden Girl

Aly Raisman started gymnastics like millions of other kids — in a toddler tumbling class. Now 17, the Massachusetts athlete is considered one of the best tumblers in the world. And she's on track to make the 2012 U.S. Olympic gymnastics team.
NPR

Coming To A Political Campaign Near You: Outside Money, And Lots Of It

Congressional candidates are increasingly raising money from supporters and groups who are ideological and outside their district — leaving some to say local voters and local issues are playing second fiddle to these donors' ideologies.
NPR

Records Show Edwards Paid Mistress $9,000 A Month

The trial of former presidential candidate John Edwards continued Tuesday in North Carolina. Edwards is accused of accepting almost a million dollars in secret payments to cover up an affair with his pregnant mistress. North Carolina Public Radio's Jeff Tiberii talks to Melissa Block about the case.
NPR

No Signal? No Problem. States Push Tech-Free Escapes

In parts of Wisconsin, Iowa and Illinois, broadband internet access and good cell phone reception are tough to come by. Robert Siegel talks with Dave Decker, executive Director of the Tri-State Tourism council, about his efforts to spin that potential nuisance into a positive, by pitching tech-free vacations.
NPR

Court: Non-Profits Must Reveal Political Ad Donors

The identities of some of America's biggest political donors may be made known now that a federal appeals court has refused to stay a lower court ruling on the subject. The trial court had said some non-profit groups that run campaign ads could no longer keep donors secret.
NPR

'Close Encounters' With Gas Well Pollution

Hundreds of thousands of natural gas wells have sprung up across the country. In Garfield County, Colo., the drilling rigs are so close to homes that some people call them "Close Encounters." When the gas boom began a decade ago, residents began asking: Is it safe to live this close? Their quest for answers became too polarizing to pursue.
NPR

Why Do Terrorists So Often Go For Planes?

The latest terrorism scare, like so many others, involved a plot to blow up an airplane. While it seems many terrorist groups are fixated on planes, there are also signs that they're now looking for easier targets that can cause catastrophic damage.
NPR

Vermont Beer Makers Bring Back Old-Time Maple Sap Brews

Boiling down the last of the season maple sap and brewing a strong dark beer to share in the summer was a common tradition on Vermont farms a couple of generations ago. The practice had all but died out but is being revived now, thanks to a handful of local brewers.

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