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Berkeley High Jazz Band Goes To Cuba

The Berkeley High School Jazz Ensemble has just begun a tour of Cuba. The director wants her young players to get a sense of the roots of some of the music they play and what Jelly Roll Morton called "the Latin Tinge" in jazz.
NPR

Author Chronicles Ever-Changing Life On The Border

Author Luis Alberto Urrea's writing career has focused on life along the U.S.-Mexican border and the lives of people who cross it. Changes in state and U.S. immigration policy all influence those lives — and thus Alberto Urrea's work — in subtle and not-so-subtle ways.
NPR

Colum McCann Links Communities With Storytelling

When Colum McCann came to the U.S. from Ireland in the early 1980s, he set out on a cross-country bicycle trip to get to know his new country and its stories. He's spent the years since telling those tales through prose. With his Story Swap project, McCann is helping diverse communities better understand each other by sharing their own stories.
NPR

What's Driving College Costs Higher?

College is now four times more expensive than it was 3 decades ago, pushing student loan debt over $1 trillion. A key reason for this growth is the competition among schools for status and prestige, says Kevin Carey, education policy director at the New America Foundation.
NPR

Photos: Mixed Feelings For L.A.'s Immigrant Minors

How do recent policy changes affect young Los Angeles immigrants? The answers vary.
NPR

Why Protesting Postal Workers Chose A Hunger Strike

Launching a hunger strike to protest a perceived political injustice is not exactly new, but it is relatively rare in the U.S. The U.S. postal workers unions are trying to turn the heads of members of Congress with the tactic.
NPR

Linda Hirshman: Gay Rights On Road To 'Victory'

Linda Hirshman's new book Victory: The Triumphant Gay Revolution draws on hundreds of in-depth interviews and archival material to chronicle the fight for gay rights in America. Hirshman talks to Michel Martin about some key leaders in this history and how their accomplishments have expanded opportunities for those who do not identify as LGBT.
NPR

Brain Science Behind Youth Life Sentence Ruling

Life sentences for juveniles who commit murder are now considered cruel and unusual punishment, according to a new Supreme Court decision. Host Michel Martin discusses the closely divided ruling with George Washington University law professor Paul Butler. He's the author of Let's Get Free: A Hip-Hop Theory of Justice.

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