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Small Cuts To Food Stamps Add Up To Big Pains For Many Recipients

The proposed farm bill would cut nearly $1 billion a year from the food stamp program, known as SNAP. While it's far less than what Republicans had originally wanted, the proposal will affect roughly 850,000 households, many of which are still struggling from cuts made only three months ago.
NPR

As States Close Prisons And Cut Crime, Feds Lag Behind

Federal prisons are chronically overcrowded after years of "tough on crime" policies. But a new report finds that a majority of states cut their imprisonment rates and saved millions — while keeping crime down.
NPR

Utah School Draws Ire For Taking Kids' Lunches; Debt Cited

Anger and frustration followed an incident Tuesday, in which up to 40 students had their lunches taken away from them at the cashier's station in an elementary school cafeteria. The food was thrown away; the students were told their accounts had no credit on them.
NPR

The U.S. Will Seek The Death Penalty for Boston Bombing Suspect

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder announced Thursday that federal prosecutors will seek the death penalty for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.
NPR

Is The U.S. Leaving A Leadership Void In The Middle East?

Robert Siegel explores the question with NPR's Michele Kelemen and Deb Amos, of whether the United States is disengaging diplomatically from the Middle East and whether that's creating a power void.
NPR

De Blasio Drops Appeal Of 'Stop And Frisk'

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio moved toward fulfilling a major campaign promise on Thursday: he announced the city will settle a long-running lawsuit against the police department's stop-and-frisk policy. A federal judge last year found that the NYPD violated the civil rights of blacks and Latinos with its aggressive tactics. Former Mayor Michael Bloomberg's administration appealed the ruling, but de Blasio won a landslide electoral victory in 2013 partly by promising to reform the stop-and-frisk policy. Now, some New Yorkers are worried about a possible rise in crime.
NPR

An Unusual Coalition Helps Mandatory Minimum Bill Clear Senate Committee

The Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday approved a bill that would lower mandatory minimum sentences for certain drug offenses and allow judges to use more discretion when determining sentences for nonviolent drug offenses.
NPR

SpaceX Could Give Struggling Texas City A Boost

The FAA is poised to decide whether to grant the space company a launch license. If it does, SpaceX could build its first commercial orbital launch facility near the border city of Brownsville. The prospect of living in the world's newest aerospace hub has stirred a buzz among locals.
NPR

One Montana Town Finds Itself Buckling Beneath The Oil Boom

Oil development is significantly straining communities across the Great Plains. In small Sidney, Mont., a steady stream of big rigs pounds the streets as a rapidly increasing population stretches the town's sewer system to its limit. As Dan Boyce reports, the mayor says the town has nowhere near enough money to pay for all of its infrastructure needs.
NPR

Retiring Rep. Henry Waxman Looks Back On Nearly 4 Decades Of Work

On Thursday, Democratic U.S. Rep. Henry Waxman of California announced that he'll retire after almost 40 years in the House of Representatives. He talks with Robert Siegel about his career as a lawmaker and contributions to health care reform.

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