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Drug Industry Moves To Cut Costs, Banks On Future Big Sellers

Bayer has announced it is buying Merck's consumer drugs business, and Pfizer is trying to take over AstraZeneca. Why is this reorganization happening now, and what does it mean for drug development?
NPR

NFL Draft To Begin, Houston Texans Have No. 1 Pick

The annual NFL draft of players starts Thursday with the first round at New York's Radio City Music Hall. The Houston Texans, by virtue of their 2-14 record last season, will have the first pick.
NPR

The Executioner's Lament

When things go wrong during an execution, the people responsible for carrying it out experience stressful, chaotic scenes. But even when the process goes right, it can take a lasting toll.
NPR

At Times All A President Can Say After Disaster Is, 'We're Here'

President Obama visited Arkansas on Wednesday, where he surveyed the damage of last month's tornado and met with residents. It's a task he and many presidents before him have had to do far too often.
NPR

The Art Of A Lost American Couturier, On Display At The Met

After a two-year renovation, the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute is reopening with an exhibit on the work of Charles James, who is now obscure, but considered America's first couturier.
NPR

Legendary D.C. Law Firm To Pay Chevron In Ecuador Pollution Case

Rain forest residents had sued the oil giant, and Washington law firm Patton Boggs tried to make the company pay up. But Chevron sued the law firm for fraud — and is now due $15 million.
NPR

Colorado Approves Financial System For Marijuana Industry

After setting aside a plan less than a week ago, the state's legislature approved a bill to give pot businesses access to banking services.
NPR

Congress Holds Former IRS Official Lois Lerner In Contempt

On a largely party-line vote, Republicans approved the resolution that stems from the alleged targeting of conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status.
NPR

After 6 Decades, 'Jet' Magazine Decides To Go All-Digital

The digest of black life is ending its print offerings after more than 60 years. The once-influential publication was an oddity: both ubiquitous and easily overlooked.
NPR

When Colleges Ditch Coal Investments, It's Barely A Drop In The Bucket

Stanford will stop investing in coal companies, but coal is still in demand worldwide and probably will be for many years. As long as that's true, coal companies are likely to find willing buyers.

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