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Homestead Act Sewed Its Way Into U.S. Fabric

The Homestead Act was born during troubled times in American History. It was passed during the Civil War, but just barely. Guest host Linda Wertheimer talks with Jonathan Earle, associate professor of history at the University of Kansas, about the act and its implications.
NPR

Still Home Sweet Home More Than A Century Later

The Homestead Act of 1862 granted free farms to almost any settler who struck out west. A German peasant named Frederick Wohler received the deed to 80 acres of farmland in north-central Kansas 138 years ago this weekend. And today, the Wohlers are still there.
NPR

Many Texans Bereaved Over 'Dead' Voter Purge

An attempt to purge tens of thousands of "dead" voters from its election rolls has spawned a backlash across the state, involving the registrar in the state's biggest county, the secretary of state and the Texas Democratic Party.
NPR

Congress Bets On Post-Election Edge, Delaying Action

A mountain of unfinished business has piled up before lawmakers, but members of both parties are hoping to put it off until after the November election. Whichever party takes power then will have an advantage at the negotiating table.
NPR

To Find Truly Wild Rice, Head North To Minnesota

Processed wild rice dominates grocery store shelves, but around the Great Lakes, Native Americans still harvest it the same way their ancestors did centuries ago. This weekend, the Wild Rice Festival in Rosemont, Minn., celebrates the tradition.
NPR

Obama Polishes His 'Regular Guy' Image With Beer

Both President Obama and Mitt Romney have been criticized for not being approachable. Their campaigns have spent the last few months convincing Americans to like them. But in the battle for likability, Obama has one tool that Romney doesn't: beer.
NPR

Antietam 'Death Studies' Changed How We Saw War

In mid-September 1862, the Army of Northern Virginia and the Army of the Potomac clashed on the banks of Antietam Creek, just outside Sharpsburg, Md., in a battle that became the nation's bloodiest day. Two photographers documented the carnage in an unprecedented series of "death studies."

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