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Online Sales Cost Cities And Counties Billions In Taxes, Mayors Say

Among the cities studied, New York City is estimated to have missed out on the most amount of money, at more than $205 million in 2012. The U.S. Mayors' Conference says it's a reason to back the Marketplace Fairness Act; not everyone agrees.
NPR

Farm Free Or Die! Maine Towns Rebel Against Food Rules

The Fourth of July is still days away, but in Maine, local food activists have already declared their independence. Ten towns so far have passed laws that essentially say local food producers don't have to abide by state or federal regulations if they are selling directly to consumers. And the revolutionary fervor has reached the statehouse.
NPR

FDA OKs Prescription-Free Plan B For All Ages, Ending Battle

The morning-after pill for emergency contraception was first approved by the FDA way back in 1999. Since then, activists have been fighting with two administrations to allow over-the-counter sales to women and teenagers. Now, after a long legal fight, the agency has agreed. We put together a timeline to recap the saga.
NPR

Humble Pie And Doughnut Burgers In The Barbershop

The NBA finals, obesity, George Zimmerman's jury, and Paula Deen. It's all up for discussion in the Barbershop. Guest host Celeste Headlee gets the lowdown on the week's news with the Barbershop guys.
NPR

Who Will Care For 'Baby Veronica?'

The Supreme Court is expected to rule on who will care for so-called 'Baby Veronica.' The baby's Cherokee father renounced his parental rights via text message, but when he later learned that she was put up for adoption, he protested. Guest host Celeste Headlee what the case means for Native American adoptions.
NPR

Obesity Is A 'Disease.' Now What?

Obesity is now classified as a disease, according to the American Medical Association. David Kessler is the former Commissioner of the FDA and author of the book, The End of Overeating. He speaks to guest host Celeste Headlee about this week's decision, and how it could impact America's overeating epidemic.
NPR

Breaking Golf's Color Barrier In Birmingham

In Birmingham, Ala., golf courses were one of the many municipal parks that officials shut down, rather than integrate. In June 1963, the city opened some of its golf courses to everybody — including blacks.
NPR

The Death Penalty's Slow But Seemingly Sure Decline

The number of executions has dropped by more than half over the past 15 years, and six states have abolished capital punishment since 2007.
NPR

House Votes Down 5-Year Farm Bill

Members of the House on Thursday rejected the measure, studded with Republican priorities. In the past, the farm bill has been a model of bipartisan support. But defections in both parties spelled the bill's doom.
NPR

Suspense Builds For Verdicts On Most-Watched High Court Cases

Again this year, the Supreme Court is waiting until the very end of the term to hand down the most anticipated decisions. Why does the high court always seem to do that?

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